07 December, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today

Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
7th December (NS)24th November (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


24th November:

  • BIEUZY, (Seventh Century), a disciple of St. Gildas (29th January), who accompanied St. Gildas to Brittany. St. Bieuzy was known as a wonderworker with the gift of healing both men and animals. He was murdered by a nobleman for refusing to interrupt his celebration of the Mass to go heal the noble’s rabid dogs.
  • CHRYSOGONUS, martyred during the Diocletianic Persecution (A.D. 303 – 305), at Aquileia. Little of any certainty is known of his life, though he has been listed in the various martyrologies since the Martyrologium Hieronymianum.
  • COLMAN of CLOYNE, unfortunately St. Colman flourished at a time for which little contemporary written history is still extant, and as far as is known no Life of St. Colman was ever written. Therefore, we are left to rely upon a diverse source of materials including a tale known as Conall Corc and the Corco Loígde (c. A.D. 700 or earlier), which includes a few brief notes on St. Colman, with the addition of information gleaned from Irish annals, genealogies, martyrologies, and even nineteenth and twentieth century Hagiographies. As far as is known St. Colman was born in Cork (c. 522-530), and whilst it is unclear whether he was raised as a Christian, it is certain that he was a man of substantial education. St. Colman spent the first forty-eight years of his adult life as a poet at the Court of Cashel, and was one of the earliest known Irish poets to write in the vernacular. Several encounters with SS. Brendan the Voyager (16th May) and Ita (15th January), prompted St. Colman to receive monastic tonsure. St. Brendan tonsured St. Colman and sent him to study under St. Jarlath (6th June) at his school at Tuam in present-day Co. Galway. St. Colman went on to found the monastery of Cluain Uama from which the Diocese of Cloyne grew, with St. Colman serving as its first bishop. Cluain Uama soon acquired a reputation as a place of great earning and was even praised in the Triads of Ireland as a centre of legal studies. St. Colman reposed on 24th November, circa A.D. 600, and was most likely buried at his monastery in Cloyne.
  • CRESCENTIAN, martyred in Rome with SS. Cyriacus, Largus, and Smaragdus (8th August). They were tortured to death on the rack, A.D. 309.
  • EANFLEDA (EANFLAED), a daughter of King St. Edwin of Northumbria (12th October), and his wife St. Ethelburga of Kent (8th September). St. Eanfleda was baptised by St. Paulinus of York (10th October), who later baptised King St. Edwin. When St. Eanfleda was only seven years of age, her father was martyred at the battle of Hatfield Chase (A.D. 633), after which her newly widowed mother, accompanied by St. Paulinus, returned to Kent with her children. In time St. Eanfleda was married to King Oswy of Northumbria, with their union resulting in the birth of St. Elfleda (8th February), who was to become the second Abbess of Whitby. Though both Christians, King Oswy followed the Celtic practice, whilst Queen St. Eanfleda followed the Roman (vide Paschal Controversy). Upon the repose of her husband, St. Eanfleda received monastic tonsure and entered her daughter’s monastery at Whitby. St. Eanfleda spent the rest of her life as a simple monastic and reposed circa A.D. 700. She was buried in the Abbey Church at Whitby, near the remains of King Oswy.
  • FELICISSIMUS, a martyr who suffered in Perugia, circa A.D. 303. Nothing further is known of his life.
  • FIRMINA, a Roman maiden tortured to death at Amelia in Umbria during the persecutions under Diocletian (circa A.D. 303).
  • FLORA and MARY, two maidens in Cordoba who were tortured and beheaded for their faith during the persecutions under the Emir of Córdoba, Abd ar-Rahman II in A.D. 851.
  • KENAN (CIANAN), (Fifth Century), when St. Patrick (17th March) established a See at present-day Duleek (Irish: Damhliag, “stone house or church”) Co. Meath circa A.D. 450, he made St. Kenan its first bishop. According to the Office of St. Cianán St. Kenan was the first in Ireland to build his cathedral of stone.
  • LEOPARDINUS, a seventh century Abbot of the monastery of St. Symphorian in Vivaris, Berry (present-day France). He was assassinated and subsequently venerated as a martyr.
  • MARINUS, martyred by the Saracens at Chandor, where he was a hermit A.D. 731.
  • PORTIANUS, a former slave who became a monk and later Abbot of Miranda in Auvergne. His influence was such that he was able to induce King Thierry of Austrasia to free his Auvergnat prisoners. St. Portianus reposed in A.D. 533.
  • PROTASIUS, ninth Bishop of Milan from A.D. 331 until his repose in A.D. 352. He defended St. Athanasius (18th January) against Arianism, and attended the Council of Sardica in A.D. 343.
  • ROMANUS of LE MANS, a nephew of St. Julian of Le Mans (27th January) who ordained him to the priesthood. St. Romanus was charged by his uncle with evangelising the area around the Gironde Estuary. He reposed at Blaye in Bordeaux in A.D. 385 after years of fruitful missionary work, especially amongst the regions’ seamen.


  • 7th December:



    Icon of St. Ambrose of Milan

  • AMBROSE, born to a Christian family in Trier, St. Ambrose was the son of the Praetorian Prefect of Gaul. He followed his father in an administrative career culminating in his appointment as governor of Aemilia-Liguria, with his seat at Milan. Upon the repose of the Arian Bishop of Milan, Auxeminus (A.D. 374), St. Ambrose was chosen bishop by acclimation, even though he was still a catechumen. Initially he refused, but final accepted, and was baptised, and ordained. St. Ambrose gained fame as a preacher, a passionate defender of orthodoxy against Arianism, and was an important figure in the conversion of St. Augustine (28th August). He is credited with introducing a great deal of Eastern theology to the West, and encouraging monasticism. St. Ambrose introduced antiphonal singing, into the Western Church, was instrumental in making hymns an integral part of the Western Liturgy, and is believed to be the author of the Te Deum.

  • Troparion of St. Ambrose of Milan — Tone IV
    In truth you were revealed to your flock as a rule of faith,
    an image of humility and a teacher of abstinence;
    your humility exalted you;
    your poverty enriched you.
    Hierarch Father Ambrose,
    entreat Christ our God
    that our souls may be saved.

    Kontakion of St. Ambrose of Milan — Tone III
    You shone forth with divine doctrine eclipsing the deception of Arius,
    shepherd and initiate of the mysteries, Ambrose.
    you worked miracles through the power of the Spirit,
    healing various passions;
    righteous father, entreat Christ our God to grant us His great mercy.

  • ANIANUS (AGNAN), a fifth century A.D. Bishop of Chartres.
  • BUITHE (BUITE, BOETHIUS), a Scot who went on a pilgrimage to Rome, and spent several years in studying Italy. Returning to Scotland, St. Buithe helped enlighten the Picts, reposing in A.D. 521.
  • BURGUNDOFARA (FARA), (On Eastern Calendars 3rd April), despite her father's initial opposition, St. Burgundofara received monastic tonsure, and served as the first Abbess of the double monastery of Evoriacum, which her father had built for her. Evoriacum was the first double monastery in France and St. Burgundofara served as Abbess there for thirty-seven years, reposing in A.D. 657. After her repose the Abbey was renamed the Abbey of Notre-Dame of Faremoutiers i.e. Fara's Monastery.
  • DIUMA, a member of the first group of missionaries invited to the Kingdom of Mercia in A.D. 653 by Peada of Mercia the son of King Penda. Following Peada’s succession to the throne, St. Diuma was consecrated bishop by St. Finan of Lindisfarne (17th February). The exact boundaries of his See are unknown, though St. Bede the Venerable (25th May) styles him ‘Bishop of the Middle Angles and the Mercians’.
  • MARTIN of SAUJON, a disciple of St. Martin of Tours (11th November) who, following the repose of his spiritual father he returned to his place of birth and founded the monastery of Saujon. St. Martin reposed circa A.D. 400.
  • SERVUS, a layman and member of the nobility in North Africa. St. Servus was tortured to death (A.D. 483) for refusing to renounce orthodoxy Christianity during the reign of the Arian Vandal King Hunneric.
  • URBAN (URBANUS), according to tradition, a Bishop of Teano in Campania who reposed circa A.D. 356.
  • VICTOR of PIACENZA, the first Bishop of Piacenza from circa A.D. 322 until his repose in A.D. 375. St. Victor was a resolute defender of orthodoxy against Arianism.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from the forthcoming Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume IV. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








06 December, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today

Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
6th December (NS)23rd November (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


23rd November:

  • ADALBERT, a monk at Cassoria in the Abruzzi. St. Adalbert later lived as a hermit on Mt. Caramanico near Chieti, attracting so many disciples that he founded the monastery of St. Nicholas for them. St. Adalbert reposed circa A.D. 1045.

  • Icon of Pope St. Clement I of Rome

  • CLEMENT, (On Eastern calendars 4th January, and 25th November (24th November on the Greek calendar)), fourth Pope of Rome (A.D. 88 - 97), and one of the Seventy Apostles. St. Clement was consecrated bishop by the Apostle Peter (29th June), is mentioned in Philippians 4:3, and wrote a letter to the Church of Corinth, which is one of the earliest Christian documents extant, apart from the canonical New Testament. St. Clement was martyred circa A.D. 101.

  • TROPARION of ST. CLEMENT I, POPE of ROME — TONE IV
    O God of our Fathers,
    always act with kindness towards us;
    take not Your mercy from us,
    but guide our lives in peace
    through the prayers of the hierarchs Clement and Peter.

    KONTAKION of ST. CLEMENT I, POPE of ROME — TONE IV
    Unshakeable and godlike towers of the Church,
    truly inspired and mighty pillars of the Faith,
    all-praised Clement and Peter, protect us all by your prayers.




  • CLEMENT, (Date Unknown), the first Bishop of Metz, according to tradition he was sent there by the Apostle Peter (29th June).

  • Icon of St. Columban

  • COLUMBANUS, an Irish monk and later missionary. St. Columbanus received monastic tonsure at the famed Bangor Abbey living there until about the age of 40 when he felt called to missionize foreign lands. Following a brief sojourn in Britain, he and his twelve companions settled in Burgundy, where he founded and served as first Abbot of what became the renowned Luxeuil Abbey. Years later some of the monks from Luxeuil went to Italy where the founded Bobbio Abbey with St. Columbanus as its first Abbot. St. Columbanus reposed circa A.D. 616 at Bobbio.
  • FELICITY (FELICITAS), (On Eastern calendars 25th January), a wealthy Roman widow, martyred (A.D. 164) along with her Seven Sons, Januarius, Felix, Philip, Silvanus, Alexander, Vitalius, and Marcial, for publicly confessing Christ, and refusing to take part in pagan rituals.

  • TROPARION of ST. FELICITAS of ROME — TONE IV
    Your holy martyr Felicitas, O Lord,
    Through her sufferings has received an incorruptible crown from You, our God.
    For having Your strength, she laid low her adversaries,
    And shattered the powerless boldness of demons.
    Through her intercessions, save our souls!


    Icon of St. Gregory of Girgenti

  • GREGORY of GIRGENTI (GREGORY AGRIGENTINUS), a native of Sicily who spent a considerable amount of time in Eastern monasteries before ultimately returning to Sicily and being consecrated Bishop of Girgenti, his native town. St. Gregory reposed circa A.D. 638.
  • GUIDO (GUY) of CASAURIA, a monk at Farfa, who later served as Abbot of Cassoria (Casauria) in the Abruzzi. St. Guido reposed circa A.D. 1045.
  • LUCRETIA, a maiden (possibly a nun) who was martyred in Mérida in A.D. 306.
  • PATERNIAN, (Fourth Century), little is known of the life of this Bishop of Fano in The Marches. It is thought, that towards the end of the persecutions under Diocletian, he was able to escape to the mountains.
  • PAULINUS (POLIN, PEWLIN, PAULHEN), a pupil of St. Illtyd (6th November) St. Paulinus went on to found and serve as first Abbot of Whitland Abbey in Carmarthenshire, south west Wales. At Whitland, St. Paulinus counted SS. David (1st March) and Teio (9th February) amongst his disciples. St. Paulinus reposed at a great age in the first years of the sixth century.
  • RACHILDIS, an anchoress near St. Wiborada (2nd May) in Saint Gall Switzerland, and disciple of the Abbot of St. Gall. St. Rachildis reposed circa A.D. 946.
  • TRUDO (TRUDON, TRON, TROND, TRUYEN, TRUDJEN), a son of the Count of Haspengouw (English: Hasbein, French: Hesbaye), in Brabant, St. Trudo received monastic tonsure from St. Remaclus (3rd September), was ordained to the priesthood by St. Clodulf of Metz (8th June), then went on to evangelise the area around present-day Sint-Truiden, Belgium. He founded the monastery that the future village of Sint-Truiden grew up around. St. Trudo reposed circa A.D. 695.
  • WILFETRUDIS, a niece of St. Gertrude of Nivelles (17th March), and her successor as Abbess of the Abbey of Nivelles in Brabant. Saint Wilfetrudis reposed circa A.D. 670.


  • 6th December:

  • ASELLA, according to St. Jerome (30th September), who referred to her as “a flower of the Lord”, St. Asella received monastic tonsure at the age of ten, and became a hermitess in Rome at the age of twelve. In time a community evolved around her of which she was the abbess. St. Asella reposed circa A.D. 406.
  • AUXILIUS, ISSERNINUS, and SECUNDINUS, (Fifth Century), it is generally believed that SS. Auxilius and Isserninus accompanied St. Patrick’s (17th March) forming the core of his first group of missionaries to Ireland, and that St. Secuninus either accompanied them or followed soon after. As the success of their mission grew, St. Patrick sent them either to Britain or Gaul to receive episcopal consecration, after which they returned to Ireland.
  • DIONYSIA, DATIVA, LEONTIA, TERTIUS, EMILIAN, BONIFACE, and COMPANIONS, a group martyred in A.D. 484 in Proconsular Africa, during the reign of the Arian Vandal King Hunneric. According to Victor of Vita, Dionysia, her young child, Majoricus, and her sister Dativa were scourged and then burnt at the stake. Emilian and Tertius were flayed alive. The others met with equally horrible tortures and deaths.
  • GERTRUDE THE ELDER, a widow, and mother of three sons, including St. Adalbald (2nd February), and Sigebert who married the future St. Bertha (4th July). Following the death of her husband, St. Gertrude founded the Abbey of Hamage, in present-day Nord-Pas-de-Calais France, and served as its first Abbess. St. Gertrude reposed in A.D. 649.
  • MAJORICUS, martyred in Proconsular Africa, circa A.D. 484, during the reign of the Arian Vandal King Hunneric. His mother, St. Dionysia (26th October), encouraged him while he was being martyred, and then buried in her own house.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from the forthcoming Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume IV. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








05 December, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today

Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
5th December (NS)22nd November (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


22nd November:


    Icon of St. Celilia of Rome


  • CECILIA, (Second or Third Century), a member of an important Roman patrician family, who had vowed perpetual virginity to God. Her parents married her to a pagan, St. Valerian (14th April), whom St. Cecilia not only convinced to respect her virginity, but converted him to Christianity as well. Soon after Valerian’s brother, St. Tiburtius was baptised, and the two brothers then dedicated their lives to giving proper burials to Christian martyrs. This resulted in their arrest and martyrdom. St. Cecilia buried them at her villa, for which she was arrested, ordered to perform pagan sacrifices, and when she refused was beheaded. St. Cecilia is the patron saint of musicians.
  • CHRISTIAN, a Bishop of Auxerre who reposed circa A.D. 873.
  • DEYNIOLEN (DEINIOL, DANIEL), Abbot of Bangor at the time of the sack of Bangor Monastery and the accompanying massacre of its monks by King Æthelfrith of Northumbria (A.D. 616). St. Deyniolen seems to have escaped the slaughter and reposed, most likely from natural causes, circa A.D. 621.
  • MAURUS, (Date Unknown – Possibly Third Century), born to Christian parents in Africa Proconsularis, like many Christians of his era, St. Maurus went on a pilgrimage to Rome, where he spent three years evangelising and helping those facing hardship. He was arrested, tortured, and finally beheaded.
  • PRAGMATIUS, a Bishop of Autun who reposed circa A.D. 520.
  • SAVINIAN (SABINIAN) of MÉNAT, (Eighth Century), the third Abbot of Moutier-Saint-Chaffre.
  • TIGRIDIA (TRIGIDIA), a daughter of Count Sancho Garcia of Castile, the founder of the double Monastery of San Salvador (Holy Saviour) in Oña, in the province of Burgos. St. Tigridia spent her live as a nun in that monastery, reposing circa A.D. 925.


  • 5th December:

  • BASILISSA, an Abbess of Oehren Abbey near Trier who reposed circa A.D. 780.
  • BASSUS, the first Bishop of Nice, he was martyred during the Decian persecutions (circa A.D. 250) by being impaled foot to head with long nails, and being burnt with red-hot pokers.
  • CAWRDAF, the son and successor of Caradog as Chieftain of Brecknock and Hereford. In his later years, he renounced his worldly life and received monastic tonsure from St. Illtyd (6th November), spending the rest of his life as a monk. St. Cawrdaf reposed circa A.D. 560.
  • CRISPINA, a wealthy matron in Thebeste in Numidia, Africa Proconsularis, who, in A.D. 304, was arrested and tried for professing Christianity and refusing to offer pagan sacrifices, and ultimately beheaded.
  • DALMATIUS, a missionary in Gaul who for one year served as Bishop of Pavia in Lombardy before being martyred A.D. 303.
  • FREMINUS (FIRMINUS), the seventh Bishop of Verdun (A.D. 486 - 502) in present-day France.
  • GERBOLD, a monk who founded the abbey of Livray in Normandy, and later was consecrated fourteenth Bishop of Bayeux. St. Gerbold reposed circa A.D. 690.
  • JOHN GRADENIGO, a Venetian nobleman who received monastic tonsure at Cuxa in the Catalonia. St. John later went to Monte Cassino where he lived as a hermit nearby, and reposed in A.D. 1025.
  • JULIUS, POTAMIA, CRISPIN, FELIX, GRATUS, and COMPANIONS, twelve martyrs in A.D. 302, at Thagura, Numidia in Africa Proconsularis, during the persecutions under Diocletian.
  • JUSTINIAN (IESTIN) , a native of Brittany who went to live as a hermit on the Isle of Ramsey off the coast of south Wales. St. David (1st March) was so struck by St. Justinian’s holiness that it is said St. David made him spiritual father for his monks and himself. St. Justinian was murdered by bandits (some sources say monks who thought his rule too strict) circa A.D. 560, and subsequently venerated as a martyr. St. David had his relics translated to his cathedral, where they remain to this day in the Holy Trinity Chapel there.
  • NICETIUS, a monk and then Abbot at Limoges, consecrated the twenty-sixth Bishop of Trier in A.D. 532. The last of the Gallo-Roman bishops, he worked to revitalise the Faith in an area which had grown indifferent to it, restored discipline and put an end to clerical vice. He fought heresy, in particular Monophysitism. St. Nicetius excommunicated King Clotaire I for immorality, for which he was exiled for a while. St. Nicetius reposed in A.D. 566.
  • PELINUS, a Bishop of Brindsi, who during the persecutions by Julian the Apostate, prayed in front of a pagan temple, in Confinium (near present-day Corfinio in the Abruzzo), which subsequently collapsed. He was beaten to death by pagan priests, A.D. 361.
  • SIGIRANUS (CYRAN, SIRAN, SIGRAM), son of the Count of Bourges, and a member of the court of Clothaire II, St. Sigiranus felt a call to religious life, he left the court and was ordained in Tours in A.D. 625. He served as Archdeacon of Tours for a while and later made a pilgrimage to Rome. St. Sigiranus was the founder of both Saint-Pierre de Longoret and Méobecq Abbeys in the diocese of Bourges. He spent that last years of his life as Abbot of Saint-Pierre de Longoret, reposing in A.D. 655.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from the forthcoming Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume IV. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








04 December, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today

Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
4th December (NS)21st November (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


21st November:

  • AMELBERGA, the first Abbess of Susteren in Limburg (present-day Netherlands) after it was rebuilt following its destruction by Vikings. St. Amelberga reposed circa A.D. 900, and her relics are enshrined in the Basilica of St. Amelberga (the abbey’s church).
  • CELSUS and CLEMENT, (Date Unknown), Roman martyrs of whom nothing beyond their names is known.
  • COLUMBANUS the YOUNGER, (Seventh Century), an Irish monk and member of the group which travelled with St. Columbanus (23rd November) to Britain, Burgundy, and Bobbio.
  • DEMETRIUS and HONORIUS, (Date Unknown), described in ancient Roman manuscripts as martyrs at Ostia at the mouth of the Tiber. No further information on either of them is extent.
  • DIGAIN, (Fifth Century), St. Digain was a son of Constantine a king of Cornwall, and possibly a brother of St. Erbin (13th January). According to tradition St. Digain was a confessor who founded the church, now named for him, at Llangernyw, Conwy County Borough in north Wales.
  • GELASIUS I, most likely the Roman born son of an African father, though he may have been born a Roman citizen in Africa (which would make him the last African-born Pope of Rome). St. Gelasius was the forty-ninth Pope of Rome serving from A.D. 492 until his repose in A.D. 496. The Acacian Schism occupied a great deal of time during his papacy, he supported Alexandria and Antioch against Constantinople’s encroachments, and is also credited with composing liturgical Prefaces and Orations for Sacramentaries.
  • HILARY, an abbot of San Vincenzo in Volturno from A.D. 1011 until his repose in A.D. 1045. St. Hilary is best known for restoring the abbey to its former illustriousness.
  • HONORIUS, EUTYCHIUS, and STEPHEN, Spanish martyrs under Diocletian (circa A.D. 300), who, though listed in several early martyrologies, nothing of their lives is extant.
  • MAURUS, the twelfth Bishop of Verona. Towards the end of his life St. Maurus resigned his See, spending the last years of his life as a hermit. St. Maurus reposed circa A.D. 600, and his relics are enshrined at Verona.
  • RUFUS of ROME, the disciple who is greeted by St. Paul (29th June) in Romans 16:13. Some early traditions consider him to be the son of Simon of Cyrene mentioned in Mark 15:21, and to have served as a bishop. St. Rufus reposed circa A.D. 90.


  • 4th December:

  • ADA, (Late Seventh Century), a niece of Engebert, Bishop of Le Mans, St. Ada received monastic tonsure at Soissons and later served as Abbess of the Abbey of Saint Julien du Pré in Le Mans.
  • BERTOARA, Abbess of Notre-Dame-de-Sales in Bourges from A.D. 612 until her repose in A.D. 614.
  • FELIX of BOLOGNA, a disciple of, and deacon under, St. Ambrose in Milan (7th December). St. Felix then served as the fifth Bishop of Bologna. He reposed in A.D. 429.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from the forthcoming Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume IV. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








03 December, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today

Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
3rd December (NS)20th November (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


20th November:

  • AMPELUS and GAIUS, martyrs, presumed to have been Sicilians, during the reign of Emperor Diocletian circa A.D. 302.
  • AUTBODUS, an Irishman who evangelised in Hainault (present-day Belgium), Artois and Picardy (present-day France). St. Autbodus spent the last years of his life as a hermit near Laon, reposing A.D. 690.
  • BENIGNUS, little is known of this saint's life, save that he was Archbishop of Milan from A.D. 465 until his repose circa A.D. 477.
  • BERNWARD (BERWARD), fourteenth Bishop of Hildesheim (Lower Saxony) from A.D. 993 until his repose in A.D. 1022. St. Bernward was noted for his skill in mathematics, painting, architecture, and particularly in the manufacture of ecclesiastical vessels, as well as his piety. He spent his early years as chaplain at the imperial court, and even served as tutor to Otto III. St. Bernward reposed A.D. 1022.


  • St. Edmund the Royal Martyr

  • EDMUND, the first patron saint of England, and a king of the East Angles who was martyred whilst defending his kingdom from Danish invaders. Nothing certain is known of his lineage and early years, though many spurious legends arose which were held to be valid by many. Unfortunately, since the Viking sack of East Anglia seems to have destroyed most of the records extant at the time, there is no contemporary East Anglian documentation of King St. Edmund’s life or reign. King St. Edmund was martyred when he refused to subjugate himself to the pagan Vikings who then had him beaten, scourged, and finally beheaded. A group of Christians buried King St. Edmund at the place now known as Bury St. Edmund, and a simple chapel was built over his grave. Later a substantial church was built in his honour, and when translating his relics to this church, they were found to be not only incorrupt, but his skin was still soft and fresh, and his head reattached with only a thin line around his neck where he had been decapitated. King St. Edmund’s shrine rapidly became one of the most frequented pilgrimage sites in England, and was richly endowed by various kings of England over the centuries. Thus, by the end of the twelfth century A.D. the abbey of Bury St. Edmunds had become one of the wealthiest, and most advantaged monasteries in England. In A.D. 1539, during the dissolution of the monasteries, King St. Edmund’s shrine was sacked, the Abbot and monks expelled, and the abbey dissolved. Though originally the patron saint of England, King St. Edmund was replaced by St. George the Trophy-bearer (23rd April) by King Edward III (r. A.D. 1327 – 1377) when King Edward took St. George as patron of the Order of the Garter. In addition to his feast on 20th November, the Moscow Patriarchate’s calendar lists the translation of his relics on 30th March.
  • EUDO (EUDON, EUDES ODO), a monk at Lérins, and Abbot-founder of Corméry-en-Velay Abbey (later called Saint-Chaffre). St. Eudo reposed circa A.D. 760.
  • EVAL (UVOL, URFOL), (Sixth Century), a bishop in Cornwall for whom the civil parish and hamlet in north Cornwall, England is named. Nothing certain is known of his life, but he is believed to have lived at the end of the sixth century.
  • LEO of NONANTULA, an Abbot of Nonantula Abbey near Modena in the Emilia-Romagna region of present-day Italy, who reposed in A.D. 1000.
  • MAXENTIA, (Date Unknown), an Irish (or Scottish) woman who fled to the Continent to escape marriage to a pagan chieftain. Once there she became an anchoress near Senlis in Picardy. Unfortunately, the chieftain eventually located St. Maxentia and beheaded her at Pont-Sainte-Maxence in present-day Nord-Pas-de-Calais-Picardie.
  • OCTAVIUS, SOLUTOR, and ADVENTOR, members of the Theban Legion who were amongst those who managed to escape the initial slaughter ordered by Maximian Herculeus. SS. Octavius, Solutor, and Adventor managed to reach Turin before being captured and executed (A.D. 297). SS. Octavius, Solutor, and Adventor are the patron saints of Turin.
  • SILVESTER, Bishop of Châlons-sur-Saône from circa A.D. 484 until his repose circa A.D. 525. He was described as 'the glory of confessors' by St. Gregory of Tours (17th November).
  • SIMPLICIUS of VERONA, traditionally purported to have been a Bishop of Verona, though there is a lack of verifiable information on his life, and he has been deleted from recent martyrologies. St. Simplicius is believed to have reposed circa A.D. 535.


  • 3rd December:

  • ABBO, an Abbot of the Abbey of Saint-Germain d'Auxerre in Burgundy. St. Abbo was consecrated Bishop of Auxerre in A.D. 857, however, after two years he resigned his See to the life of a monk. He reposed circa A.D. 860.
  • AGRICOLA, (Date Unknown), a martyr in Hungary, who although there are no lives extant, he is listed in all the ancient martyrologies.
  • ATTALIA (ATTALA), one of the three daughters of Adalbert, Duke of Alsace, and a niece of St. Odilia (13th December). St. Attalia was a nun who was appointed first Abbess of the Abbey of St. Stephen in Strasbourg. St. Attalia reposed in A.D. 741.
  • BIRINUS, a native of Lombardy, consecrated Bishop by Asterius Bishop of Genoa, and then sent by Pope Honorius to convert the West Saxons. One of his earliest converts was Cynegils, King of Wessex, at whose baptism King St. Oswald of Northumbria (5th August) served as godfather. St. Birinus founded the Diocese of Dorchester in Oxfordshire where reposed circa A.D. 650. His relics were translated to the Church of St. Peter at Winchester by Bishop Hedda in A.D. 686. St. Birinus is also known as the Apostle of Wessex.
  • CASSIAN, a court recorder at the trial of St. Marcellus (30th October) at Tangiers (A.D. 298). When the sentence of death was handed down, St. Cassian, decrying the court’s decision, and revieled himself to be a Christian. He was rewarded with arrest and soon after martyrdom.
  • CLAUDIUS, CRISPIN, MAGINA, JOHN, and STEPHEN, (Date Unknown), martyrs in North Africa, of whom nothing is known.
  • ELOQUE (ELOQUIUS), a disciple of St. Fursey (16th January) and later Abbot of the Abbey of Saint-Pierre de Lagny. St. Eloquius reposed circa A.D. 666.
  • ETHERNAN, (Date Uncertain), a Scot who studied in Ireland where, in time, he was consecrated bishop. He then returned to Scotland where he devoted the rest of his life spreading the Gospel. His Feast and Office were in the Aberdeen Breviary.
  • LUCIUS, (Second Century), In the Liber Pontificalis’ (c. 6th century A.D.) biography of Pope St. Eleutherius (26th May) is the following brief sentence: ‘He received a letter from Lucius, a British king, who wanted to become a Christian on his authority’. From this developed the tradition of King St. Lucius, a British king who requested missionaries from the Pope of Rome. For centuries after, this legend of the “first Christian king of Britain” was widely considered an accurate account of Christianity among the early Britons. And while it has been argued that this is the only explanation for the existence of an organised British church in Roman times, there is no contemporary evidence that King St. Lucius ever lived. Modern scholars generally follow the argument of German theologian and church historian Adolf von Harnack († A.D. 1930) who suggested that the statement in the Liber Pontificalis is due to a transcription error. As the Middle Ages progressed the legend of King St. Lucius grew more and more elaborate. According to the Roman Martyrology St. Lucius abdicated his throne, became a missionary, and served as the first Bishop of Chur, in the present-day Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. Various versions of the legend of King St. Lucius appeared in the Historia Brittonum (early 9th century A.D.), William of Malmesbury’s Gesta Pontificum Anglorum (early 12th century A.D.), and the Book of Llandaff (also early 12th century A.D.). However, it was Geoffrey of Monmouth’s early 12th century A.D. chronicle, Historia Regum Britanniae, which stands out as the most historically significant account of the life of St. Lucius, in which Geoffrey stresses the saint’s virtues, and provides a detailed, albeit mythical, story of Christianity’s growth in Britain during St. Lucius’ reign. This account remained the exemplar until well into the 20th century A.D., when historians pointed out the unlikeliness of a British king south of Hadrian’s Wall in the second century A.D., and certainly none who would have been in the position to send a delegation to the Pope. King St. Lucius is generally believed reposed circa A.D. 156 at Gloucester, though there is said to have been a plaque in the church of St. Peter upon Cornhill in the City of London (destroyed in the Great Fire A.D. 1666), crediting St. Lucius with founding of that church in A.D. 179. What are said to be St. Lucius’ relics are enshrined in the Cathedral of St. Luzius in Chur, although scholarly consensus is that the See only dates from the early fourth century A.D.
  • MIROCLES, the seventh Bishop of Milan. St. Mirocles he was Bishop when Emperor Saint Constantine the Great (3rd June) issued the Edict of Milan, and is also recorded as being present at the Lateran Council of A.D. 313, as well as the Synod of Arles of A.D. 314 which condemned Donatism. In addition he helped in the development of the Liturgy and Chant of the Ambrosian Rite. St. Mirocles reposed circa A.D. 316, later his life and work were praised by St. Ambrose of Milan (7th December).
  • SOLA (SOL, SOLUS, SUOLO), an English monk who went to Germany where he became a disciple of St. Boniface (5th June) who later ordained him to the priesthood. St. Sola then lived as a hermit near Fulda in Hesse, then near Eichstätt in Bavaria. At each, St. Sola attracted disciples. The number of disciples at Eichstätt were so great that he founded an abbey at Solnhofen for them where he spent the rest of his life. St. Sola reposed in A.D. 794.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from the forthcoming Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume IV. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
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02 December, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
2nd December (NS)19th November (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


19th November:

  • ATTO, Abbot of Tordino near Teramo in Abruzzo which had been founded by monks from Monte Cassino. St. Atto reposed circa A.D. 1010.
  • CRISPIN, a fourth century Bishop of Ecija in Andalusia who was beheaded in the persecutions under Maximian Herculeus. St. Crispin has a special office in the Mozarabic Breviary and Missal.
  • ERMENBURGH, also known as Domna Ebba (Lady Ebba, shortened to Domneva), was a Kentish princess and mother of SS. Mildred of Thanet (13th July), Milburgh (23rd February), and Mildgytha (17th January). Following the death of her husband St. Ermenburgh founded the Abbey of Minster in Thanet, in present-day Minster, Kent, England. The date of St. Ermenburgh’s repose is uncertain, but generally believed to be circa A.D. 700.
  • JAMES of SASSEAU, a native of Constantinople and career army officer, who after many various postings finally ended up in Gaul where he retired. St. James then entered religious life. He was ordained to the priesthood at Clermont, received monastic tonsure at Bourges, and ended his days as a hermit in Sasseau. St. James reposed circa A.D. 865.
  • MAXIMUS, according to the Roman Martyrology, St. Maximus was martyred at Rome during the reign of Emperor Valerian (A.D. 254-259). It is possible he was a priest. Nothing further is known of his life.
  • MEDANA, (Eighth Century), an Irish holy virgin who settled in Galloway in Scotland. Nothing further is known of her life.
  • SEVERINUS, EXUPERIUS, and FELICIAN, martyred (A.D. 170) at Vienne during the reign of Marcus Aurelius (A.D. 161 – 180).
  • TUTO (TOTTO), founder of Ottobeuren Abbey in Ottobeuren Bavaria in A.D. 764. St. Tuto reposed in A.D. 815.


  • 2nd December:

  • BIBIANA (VIBIANA, VIVIAN), (Date Unknown), aside from her name, nothing certain is known about St. Bibiana. A later legend which connects her with the martyrdom of SS. John and Paul (26th June), though popular, has no basis in fact.
  • CHROMATIUS, the second Archbishop of Aquileia (north-eastern present-day Italy) from A.D. 388 until his repose in A.D. 407. At the Synod of Aquileia St. Chromatius advocated for a strong condemnation of Arianism. St. Chromatius was also friends with SS. John Chrysostom (13th November), Ambrose of Milan (7th November), and Jerome (30th September).
  • EUSEBIUS, MARCELLUS, HIPPOLYTUS, MAXIMUS, ADRIA, PAULINA, NEON, MARY MARTANA, and AURELIA, a group of martyrs during the reign of Valerian (A.D. 254-259), who were tortured and then killed. Eusebius, a priest, Marcellus, his deacon, Neon and Mary, lay people, were beheaded; Adria and Hippolytus were scourged to death; Paulina tortured to death; Maximus was drowned in the Tiber.
  • EVASIUS, an early, perhaps first, Bishop of Brescia in Lombardy. No further information is extant.
  • LUPUS of VERONA, (Date Unknown), a Bishop of Verona of whom nothing further is known.
  • PONTIAN and COMPANIONS, St. Pontian, along with four others whose names are no longer known, was martyred during the Valerian persecutions, circa A.D. 259.
  • SECURUS, SEVERUS, JANUARIUS, and VICTORINUS, martyred by the Arian Vandals in North Africa circa A.D. 450.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from the forthcoming Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume IV. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?