22 January, 2017

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20 January, 2017

Orthodox Western Saints for Today

Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
20th January (NS)7th January (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


7th January:

  • ALDRIC (ALDERICUS, AUDRY), after spending his childhood in the court of Charlemagne, St. Aldric left at the age of twenty-one to commenced studies for the priesthood. Following ordination, he was chaplain in the court of Louis the Pious for nine years. St. Aldric was consecrated fourteenth Bishop of Le Mans in A.D. 832, and was known as an excellent administrator and pastor of great personal sanctity. Following the death of Louis, St. Aldric supported Charles the Bald as successor, resulting in St. Aldric exile from Le Mans. Though he was soon reinstated by Pope Gregory IV. St. Aldric also served as Papal legate to King Pepin of Aquitaine, and participated in the Council of Paris and Council of Tours. St. Aldric reposed in A.D. 856.
  • ANASTASIUS, fifty-fifth Archbishop of Sens in Burgundy from A.D. 967 until his repose in A.D. 976. St. Anastasius was a great champion of the Abbey of Saint-Pierre-le-Vif, in whose church his relics are enshrined.


  • Icon of St. Brannoc

  • BRANNOC, A sixth century saint, legends concerning him vary and are unreliable. However, it seems that he served for a time as tutor to the children of King St. Brychan of Brycheiniog (6th April), and accompanied the king on a pilgrimage to venerate the tombs of the Apostles, possibly stopping in Brittany on his return for several years. Returning to Britain, he founded a monastery at Braughton, near Barnstaple in Devon, where his relics are said to rest beneath the church altar.
  • CRISPIN (I & II), there are two St. Crispins associated with the See of Pavia in Lombardy. The first, was a third century A.D. Bishop of Pavia for 35 years, he reposed circa A.D. 250, and there is no further information on him extant. The second was Bishop of Pavia during the fifth century A.D. His episcopacy coincided with Pope St. Leo the Great’s (10th November ) papacy, and St. Crispin (II) was a signatory of the acts of the Council of Milan (A.D. 451) at which the bishops of northern Italy endorsed the acclaimed epistola dogmatica of Pope St. Leo the Great against Nestorianism and Eutychianism. St. Crispin (II) reposed A.D. 465.
  • CRONAN BEG, (Seventh Century), a Bishop of Ændrum, Co. Down, Ireland, St. Cronan Beg is mentioned in connexion with the Paschal Controversy in A.D. 640. There is no further information extant.
  • EMILIAN (AEMILIANUS), a monk at Saujon near Saintes, and later a hermit in the forest of Combes near Bordeaux. St. Emilian reposed in A.D. 767. St. Emilian is the namesake of the Bordeaux wine appellation d'origine controlee Saint-Émilion.
  • KENTIGERNA, St. Kentigerna was the mother of St. Coellan (29th July) and the daughter of Kelly, Prince of Leinster, Ireland. Upon the death of her husband, she left Ireland and moved to Inchebroida Island in Loch Lomond, Scotland, where, along with her brother St. Comgan (13th October) and her son St. Foellan (9th January), she lived as an anchoress until her repose A.D. 733. A church remains dedicated to her to this day.
  • REINOLD (RAINALD, REYNOLD), a possible descendant of Charlemagne, St. Reinhold received monastic tonsure at the Abbey of St. Pantaleon in Cologne, and was given the obedience of supervising construction at the abbey. In A.D. 960 he was beaten to death by stonemasons working at the abbey and his body was thrown into a pool of water neat the Rhine River. It is said his body was later discovered through divine revelation.
  • TILLO (THILLO, THIELMAN, THÉAU, TILLOINE, TILLON, TILMAN), a native of Saxony who was kidnaped, enslaved, and then brought to the Low Countries. St. Eligius of Noyon (1st December) ransomed St. Tillo who then enter the Abbey of Saint-Pierre-Saint-Paul de Solignac where he received monastic tonsure and was ordained to the priesthood. St. Tillo then worked to enlighten the areas around Kortrijk and Tournai in present-day Belgium. Towards the end of his life, St. Tillo retired to live as a hermit at Solignac. He reposed A.D. 702.
  • VALENTINE, an abbot who became a missionary bishop in Rhaetia (roughly the area of the borders of present-day Italy, Austria, and Switzerland). Later in life St. Valentine retired to spend the rest of his days as a hermit at Mais in the Austrian Tyrol where he reposed circa A.D. 470.
  • WITTIKUND, a pagan Westphalian duke who converted to Christianity following a vision. With Charlemagne as his sponsor, St. Wittikund received the sacrament of Baptism in A.D. 785.


  • 20th January:

  • FABIAN, (on Eastern Calendars 5th August), a layman who happened to be in Rome and in the crowd of onlookers on the day a successor to Pope St. Anterus was being selected. St. Fabian was chosen to be the twentieth Pope of Rome by acclimation when a dove alighted upon his head and the assembled clergy and laity took this as a sign from the Holy Spirit. St. Fabian served the See of Rome from his selection in A.D. 236 until his martyrdom in A.D. 250. St. Fabian has been credited with sending Saint Denis of Paris (9th October) Gaul, and with being the first martyr of the Decian Persecution.
  • FECHIN, a native of Co. Sligo in Connaught and the founder of several monasteries in that region; St. Fechin is principally remembered for founding the monastery at Fore (Fobar), Co. Westmeath. Ecclefechan and St. Vigean’s near Arbroath in Scotland also perpetuate his memory. He is said to have lived a life of extraordinary penance, spending his nights reciting the entire Psalter. St. Fechin reposed circa A.D. 665.
  • MAURUS, a nephew of Pope John IX, St. Maurus was priested and then received monastic tonsure at Classe in Ravenna, where in A.D. 926 he was elected Abbot. In A.D. 934, St. Maurus was consecrated Bishop of Cesena. As Bishop, St. Maurus had built a small cell on Spaziano Hill in which his relics were buried upon his repose in A.D. 946. Around sixty-five years later construction was commenced on the Abbey of Santa Maria del Monte at the location of St. Maurus’ cell.
  • MOLAGGA (LAICIN), though there are several Saints of the same name (most Irish hagiographers count at least twelve), and it is often difficult to disentangle their Lives, it is believed this St. Molagga was a disciple of St. David of Wales (1st March). Returning to his native Ireland, he founded a monastery at what is now Fermoy (Irish: Mainistir Fhear Maí, meaning “monastery of the Men of the Plain”) Co. Cork. He was distinguished for his exceptional learning and piety as well as his Christian charity. St. Molagga seems to have survived the Great Pestilence of A.D. 664, reposing circa A.D. 655, and is greatly venerated in the South of Ireland.

  • Icon of St. Sebastian

  • SEBASTIAN, (on Eastern Calendars 18th December ), an officer in the imperial army, captain of the Praetorian guard, a favourite of Diocletian, and a secret Christian. During the Diocletianic Persecution, St. Sebastian visited imprisoned Christians, and is reputed to have converted soldiers, a governor, and healed the wife of a fellow guard by making the sign of the Cross over her. Soon his identity as a Christian was no longer secret, and his status and favour with Diocletian proved no help. St. Sebastian was arrested, tied to a tree, and shot full of arrows by soldiers who used him for target practice. He miraculously survived, but was ordered beaten to death by Diocletian, circa A.D. 288.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2112-2017  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume I. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.






All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!







19 January, 2017

Orthodox Western Saints for Today

Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
19th January (NS)6th January (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


6th January:

  • ANASTASIUS, JUCUNDUS, FLORUS, FLORIANUS, PETER, RATITES, TATIA, and TILIS, (Fourth Century), an unknown number of Christians martyred at Syrmium in Pannonia (present-day Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia). The only surviving details are the names of these eight.
  • DIMAN (DIMAS, DIMA), a monk under St. Columba of Iona (9th June), and later Bishop of Connor in Ireland, St. Diman reposed A.D. 658. He was one of the prelates to whom the Church in Rome addressed its epistle on the Paschal Controversy and on the errors of Pelagianism.
  • EDEYRN, (Sixth Century), the patron saint of a church in Brittany, who spent the last part of his life as a hermit. Legend says St. Edeyrn was originally from Britain and a friend of King Arthur.
  • EIGRAD, (Sixth Century), a brother of St. Samson (28th July), he was a disciple of St. Illtyd (6th November) and founder of a church at Anglesey in Wales.
  • FREDERICK of ARRAS, a son of the Count of Verdun, St. Frederick gave his inheritance to the Bishop of Verdun. St. Frederick then went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. When he returned to France, St. Frederick received monastic tonsure at the Abbey of Saint-Vanne in Verdun. He later served as Prior of the Abbey of St. Vaast in Arras, Pas-de-Calais. St. Frederick reposed in A.D. 1020.
  • HYWYN, (Sixth Century), St. Hywyn was most likely a companion of St. Cadfan (1st November) on his return journey from Brittany to Cornwall and Wales A.D. 516. It is believed that he was the founder of Aberdaron (Carnarvon); in addition, there are several churches in the West of England known as St. Owen’s or St. Ewen’s, which may have him for their patron. There are no other details of his life extant.
  • MACRA, a maiden from Rheims. St. Macra was tortured, mutilated, and martyred for being a Christian in Fismes in Champagne in A.D. 287, prior to the commencement of the Diocletianic Persecution.
  • MARTYRS of NORTH-WEST AFRICA, an unknown number of Christians burnt at the stake during the persecutions under Septimius Severus circa A.D. 210.
  • MELANIUS (MELAINE), a Breton who served as Bishop of Rennes during the time of the Frankish invasion of Gaul. Following Clovis’ conversion to Christianity, St. Melanius enjoyed a favourable position in court. St. Melanius is remembered for his great sanctity and eradicating paganism from his See. He reposed circa A.D. 535.
  • MERINUS, a disciple of St. Donat (Dunwyd) (7th August) of Bangor, and patron saint of churches in Wales and in Brittany. He lived at some point in the sixth century A.D.; there is no further information on this saint extant.
  • PETER of CANTERBURY, a member of the Gregorian mission to the Anglo-Saxons, St. Peter was the first Abbot of the monastery (SS. Peter and Paul — later St. Augustine’s) founded by St. Augustine of Canterbury (27th May). St. Peter was killed at Ambleteuse, near Boulogne either A.D. 607 or A.D. 614. His relics are still honoured at the location of his repose.
  • SCHOTIN (SCARTHIN), (Sixth Century), whilst still quite young, St. Schotin left his native Ireland to become a disciple of St. David (1st March) in Wales. He later returned to Ireland, living as a hermit on Mt. Mairge in Leix for many years, St. Schotin was also the founder of a school for youths at Kilkenny.
  • WILTRUDIS, widow of Berthold, Duke of Bavaria, who received monastic tonsure (circa A.D. 947) and founded Bergen Abbey near Neuburg an der Donau, Bavaria (circa A.D. 976). St Wiltrudis reposed circa A.D. 986.


  • 19th January:

  • ARCONTIUS, (Eighth or Ninth Century), a Bishop of Viviers who, local legend states, was beheaded by a mob of Viviers’ citizens.
  • BASSIAN, a Bishop of Lodi in Lombardy who attended the Council of Aquilia (A.D. 381) with his friend St. Ambrose of Milan (7th December). St. Bassian reposed in A.D. 413.
  • BRANWALLADER, (Sixth Century ?), (also Branwalader, Branwalator, Breward and Brelade: it is also likely that “St. Brelade” is a corruption of “St. Branwallader”) was a Celtic or Welsh monk, who is said to have been a bishop in Jersey, although at the time Jersey would have been part of the ancient diocese of Dol. He has also been said to have been the son of the Cornish king, Kenen. As with many of the early saints of this part of the world, there is little reliable information extant. It is believed that he worked with St. Samson (28th July) in Cornwall and the Channel Islands, where the Parish of St. Brelade in Jersey is dedicated to him, as is the Parish of St. Breward in Cornwall. It is also possible that he travelled with St. Samson to Brittany, where he has sometimes been confused with SS. Brendan (16th May) and Brannoc (7th January).

    His feast was kept at Winchester, Exeter, and Cornwall (in Cornwall on 9th February and 6th June — 19th January most likely being the translation of his relics) at least from the tenth century A.D. King Athelstan, founder of Milton Abbey in Dorset, obtained some of the saint’s relics (an arm or head), translating them to Milton Abbey in A.D. 935. The full name of Milton Abbey being the Abbey Church of St. Mary, St. Samson, and St. Branwalader.
  • CATELLUS, (Ninth Century), a ninth century A.D. Bishop of Castellammare di Stabia on the Gulf of Naples. St. Catellus is said by some sources to have spent part of his life as a hermit on a nearby mountain.
  • CONTESTUS, the Bishop of Bayeux in Normandy from A.D. 480 until his repose circa A.D. 510. It has been said that his dedication to, and strict preaching about, the proper way of life for Christians at times angered powerful locals to the point St. Contestus often had to go into hiding, living as a hermit, for his own safety.
  • FIRMINUS, (Date Uncertain), the third Bishop of the now extinct See of Gévaudan in the region of Occitanie of present-day southern France.
  • LOMER (LAUDOMARUS), a shepherd boy who became a priest, and then a hermit. In time a group of disciples formed for whom St. Lomer founded an abbey at Corbion near Chartres. St. Lomer was also known for his wonderworking. St. Lomer is said to have been over one hundred years of age when he reposed in A.D. 593.
  • MARIUS (MARIS), MARTHA, AUDIFAX, and ABACHUM (ABACUM), a family of wealthy Persian nobles, who converted to Christianity. SS. Marius and Martha, husband and wife, along with their sons SS. Audifax and Abachum, went on a pilgrimage to Rome to venerate the tombs of the martyrs, and whilst there also participated in burying the martyrs of the current persecutions under Claudius II. Soon this pious family was also arrested and martyred. SS. Marius, Audifax, and Abachum were beheaded, and St. Martha was drowned, A.D. 270.
  • MARTYRS of NUMIDIA, (Second Century), an unknown number of martyrs in Numidia (present-day Algeria) of whom only the names of these nine are known: Paul, Gerontius, Januarius, Saturninus, Successus, Julius, Catus, Pia, and Germana. a disciple of St. Felician of Foligno (24th January), from whom she also received monastic tonsure. When St. Felician was arrested for his faith, St. Messalina visited him and having been discovered to be a Christian as well, was arrested, ordered to sacrifice to pagan gods, and when she refused, was beaten to death, A.D. 251.
  • PONTIAN (PONTIANUS, PONZIANO), martyred at Spoleto in Perugia under Marcus Aurelius, circa A.D. 169 - 175. Nothing else is known of him, and in some source material he is confused with the St. Pontian (13th August) who was eighteenth Pope of Rome (A.D. 230 – 235).
  • REMIGIUS (REMI), a son of Charles Martel, and the third Archbishop of Rouen from A.D. 755 until his repose circa A.D. 772. St. Remigius was instrumental in implementing the Roman rite and chant in the Gallic church.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2112-2017  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume I. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.






All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!







Christ is Baptised!

To all following the Old Calendar
My best wishes for a Joyous Feast Day.



Icon of the Baptism of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ


When You, O Lord were baptized in the Jordan
The worship of the Trinity was made manifest
For the voice of the Father bore witness to You
And called You His beloved Son.
And the Spirit, in the form of a dove,
Confirmed the truthfulness of His word.
O Christ, our God, You have revealed Yourself
And have enlightened the world, glory to You!


— Troparion of the Feast


The Feast of Theophany (from Greek θεοφανεια, meaning "appearance of God") is the culmination of the Nativity Season, which begins on 25th December and ends on 6th January (the Twelve Days of Christmas). The feast is called Theophany because at the baptism of Christ the Holy Trinity appeared clearly to mankind for the first time — the Father's voice is heard from Heaven; the Son of God is incarnate and standing physically in the Jordan; and the Holy Spirit descends on Him in the form of a dove (Matthew 3:13-17; Mark 1:9-11; Luke 3:21-22).

On the Feast of the Baptism of Christ, the Holy Church proclaims our faith in the most awe inspiring mystery; incomprehensible to human intellect; that of one God in three Persons. It teaches us to confess and glorify the Holy Trinity, one in Essence and Indivisible. It exposes and overthrows the errors of ancient teachings which attempted to explain the Creator of the world by reason, and in human terms. The Church shows the necessity of Baptism for believers in Christ, and it animates us with a sense of deep gratitude for the illumination and purification of our sinful nature. The Church teaches that our salvation and cleansing from sin is possible only by the power of the grace of the Holy Spirit.

The origin of the Feast of Theophany goes back to Apostolic times, and it is mentioned in The Apostolic Constitutions (Book V:13). In the ancient Church it was the custom to baptize catechumens at the Vespers of Theophany, with Baptism then being revealed as the spiritual illumination of mankind. Today the Great Blessing of Water is performed on Theophany, and the holy water so blessed is used by the local priest to bless the homes of the faithful, as well as being a primary source of Holy Water kept in the homes of the faithful. Much liturgical music for this Feast was composed by the monks Joseph the Studite, Theophanes and Byzantios. St John of Damascus said that the Lord was baptized, not because He Himself had need for cleansing, but "to bury human sin by water," to fulfill the Law, to reveal the mystery of the Holy Trinity, and finally, to sanctify "the nature of water" and to offer us the form and example of Baptism.

JOYOUS FEAST DAY!



© 2012-2017  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

18 January, 2017

Orthodox Western Saints for Today

Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
18th January (NS)5th January (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


5th January:

  • CERA (CIAR, CYRA, CIOR, CEARA), a native of Tipperary who founded and was abbess of two convents, one at Kilkeary and the other at Tech Telle (Tehelly). There is no further reliable information on this saint extant, and she is sometimes confused with St. Kiara (Chier) (vide infra)
  • CONVOYON (CONWOÏON), an archdeacon of Vannes who became a hermit, and in A.D. 831 founded and was first Abbot of the Abbey of Saint-Sauveur, Redon on the border between Neustria and Brittany. St. Convoyon was driven from Saint-Sauveur by invading Vikings and he spent the rest of his life in exile, reposing A.D. 868.
  • EMILIANA, (Sixth Century), the youngest of St. Gregory the Dialogist’s (3rd September) three paternal aunts. St. Emiliana and her eldest sister St. Tarsila (24th December), lived as monastics in their parents’ home. St. Gregory wrote of their lives.
  • GAUDENTIUS of GNESEN, a Bohemian noble and younger brother of Saint Adalbert of Prague (23rd April). He received monastic tonsure at the Abbey of Saint Alessio, Aventine, in Rome, and later joined his brother on his mission to Prussia. Escaping the massacre in which St. Adalbert was martyred, St. Gaudentius was consecrated the first Archbishop of Gniezno (Gnesen) (in present-day Poland) when the See was established in A.D. 1000. St. Gaudentius reposed circa A.D. 1004.
  • KIARA (CHIER), a spiritual daughter of St. Fintan Munnu (21st October), she lived in North Tipperary at a place now named Kilkeary in her honour. St. Kiara reposed circa A.D. 680; there is no further information extant.
  • TELESPHORUS, (on Eastern Calendars 22nd February), a Greek, likely from Calabria, who was Pope of Rome from A.D. 125 until his martyrdom in A.D. 136. There are many legends regarding St. Telesphorus, though, aside from being martyred, none can be substantiated.


  • 18th January:

  • ARCHELAIS, THECLA, and SUSANNA, three young girls who fled to Nola in the Campagna in order to escape persecution. Alas, they were arrested in Nola for being Christians, tortured, and taken to Salerno where they were beheaded in A.D. 293.
  • DEICOLA (DEICOLUS, DESLE, DICHUL, DEEL, DELLE, DEILLE), an elder brother of St. Gall (16th October). St. Deicola was a monk at Bangor Abbey in Ireland who followed St. Columbanus (23rd November) to Burgundy, where he helped found the monastery of Luxeuil. When St. Columbanus was exiled from Luxeuil in A.D. 610, St. Deicola was too advanced in years to accompany him and so founded a new monastery at Lure in Burgundy, where he lived as a hermit until his repose circa A.D. 625.
  • FAUSTINA and LIBERATA, two sisters who founded the monastery of Santa Margarita at Como in Lombardy. Both reposed in A.D. 582, and their relics are enshrined at the cattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta in Como.
  • LEOBARD (LIBERD), a disciple of St. Gregory of Tours (17th November), who lived for over twenty years as a hermit near the Abbey of Marmoutier, just outside of Tours. St. Leobard reposed A.D. 593.
  • PRISCA, generally said to have been a young maiden from an aristocratic Roman Christian family who flourished in either the third or perhaps the first century A.D. according to tradition St. Prisca was martyred by beheading for refusing to renounce Christianity. Whilst her cultus has existed for time immemorial, the extant Acts are not historically accurate and the details are for the most part fantastic.
  • ULFRID (WOLFRED, WILFRID), an Englishman who was a missionary in the area that is present-day Germany and Sweden. St. Ulfrid was martyred in A.D. 1028 by Norse pagans for destroying either a tree dedicated to, or a statue of, Thor.
  • VOLUSIAN, an Imperial Roman senator who was selected to be the seventh Bishop of Tours in A.D. 491. He was driven from his See shortly after his consecration by Arian Visigoths, and reposed in exile in Toulouse A.D. 496.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2112-2017  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume I. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.






All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!







17 January, 2017

Orthodox Western Saints for Today

Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
17th January (NS)4th January (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


4th January:

  • AQUILINUS, GEMINUS, EUGENE, MARCIAN, QUINTUS, THEODOTUS, and TRYPHON, seven Christians martyred (circa A.D. 484) in North Africa during the reign of the Arian King Hunneric.
  • DAFROSA (AFFROSA), wife of St. Flavian (22nd December), and mother of SS. Bibiana (2nd December) and Demetria (21st June ). St. Dafrosa was martyred (circa A.D. 362) by beheading in the persecutions during the reign of Julian the Apostate.
  • FERREOLUS, a sixth century A.D. Bishop of Uzès and brother of St. Tarsica of Rodez (15th January). St. Ferreolus founded a monastery in his diocese, and wrote its Rule. He was also exiled from his See for three years by King Childebert I over political differences. St. Ferreolus reposed in A.D. 581.
  • GREGORY of LANGRES, a governor of Autun, who following the death of his wife, was ordained to the priesthood, and later consecrated sixteenth Bishop of Langres. St. Gregory was noted for the kindness and understanding with which he dealt with his flock. He was the great-uncle of St. Gregory of Tours (17th November). St. Gregory reposed in A.D. 539, and was succeeded by his son, St. Tetricus (20th March).
  • LIBENTIUS (LIÄWIZO), a monk who ministered to the poor and sick in Bremen prior to being consecrated Archbishop of Hamburg and Bishop of Bremen (one See) in A.D. 988. St. Libentius served his See until his repose in A.D. 1013.
  • MAVILUS (MAJULUS), martyred in Hadrumetum (present-day Sousse, Tunisia) during the reign of Caracalla for refusing to worship idols. St. Mavilus was thrown to wild animals to devour. His martyrdom is dated A.D. 212.
  • PHARÄILDIS (VAREIDE, VERYLDE, VEERLE), a young maiden in Ghent, St. Pharäildis, who had made a vow of virginity, was married against her will. She was abused by her husband for her insistence on keeping her vow and for her late-night visits to church. When St. Pharäildis was widowed, she was still a virgin. One legend says she caused water to spring forth, which healed sick children. St. Pharäildis reposed circa A.D. 740, and is one of the patron saints of Ghent.
  • PRISCUS, PRISCILLIAN, and BENEDICTA, three Christians martyred (A.D. 362) for refusing to renounce their faith during the persecutions under Julian the Apostate.
  • RIGOBERT, Abbot of L'Abbaye d'Orbais in the Marne region, and a celebrated wonderworker, consecrated Archbishop of Rheims in A.D. 721. St. Rigobert was later exiled by Charles Martel, and an uncanonical intruder was installed. St. Rigobert was later able to return to his See, but to avoid scandal, St. Rigobert deferred to the intruder and spent the rest of his life as a hermit. St. Rigobert reposed circa A.D. 745.


  • 17th January:

  • ANTONY, MERULUS, and JOHN, (Sixth Century), three holy monks at St. Andrew's (now San Gregorlo) on the Coelian Hill in Rome. They were disciples of St. Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September) who wrote extensively of their virtues, wonderworking, and gifts of clairvoyance. All three reposed circa A.D. 590.
  • GENULFUS (GENOU) and GENITUS, two third century A.D. monks at Selles-sur-Nahon in Berry in the Loire Valley (present-day Department of Indre, France).
  • JOSEPH of FREISING, the third Bishop of Freising in Bavaria. St. Joseph also founded the Abbey of St. Zeno of Verona at Isen also in Bavaria. St. Joseph reposed in A.D. 764, his relics were enshrined at Isen Abbey.
  • MILDGYTH, St. Mildgyth was the youngest and least well known of the three daughters of Merewald, King of Mercia, and Ermenburga, Princess of Kent. Along with her sisters, SS. Mildred (13th July) and Milburgh (23rd February), St. Mildgyth entered monastic life. After receiving monastic tonsure at Eastry Monastery, she joined her sisters at Minster-in-Thanet, and upon at St. Mildred’s death succeeded her as abbess. St. Mildgyth reposed circa A.D. 676.
  • NENNIUS, (Sixth Century) no details of this saint survive to this day, though he is mentioned in the Lives of several other saints. He was a member of the Irish nobility who forsook his high-born life for the monastery. He began under St. Fiace of Leinster (12th October), and later moved on to Clonard as a disciple of St. Finian (12th December). He is counted as one of the ‘Twelve Apostles of Ireland’.
  • RICHIMIR (RICHIMIRUS), with the blessing and support of the Bishop of Le Mans, St. Richimir, along with a group of fellow-monk disciples founded a monastery in the Loire Valley. St. Richimir served as the first Abbot, of the monastery which came to be called Saint-Rigomer-des-Bois after him. St. Richimir reposed circa A.D. 715.
  • SULPICIUS (II) THE PIOUS, the Bishop of Bourges in the Loire Valley from A.D. 624 until his repose in A.D. 647. Born to a wealthy noble family, St. Sulpicius decided at an early age to renounce the world and serve Christ. Known for his piety and later in life St. Sulpicius resigned his See to live a life of prayer and service to those in need.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2112-2017  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume I. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.






All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!







16 January, 2017

Orthodox Western Saints for Today

Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
16th January (NS)3rd January (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


3rd January:

  • ANTHERUS, (on Eastern Calendars 5th August), the nineteenth Pope of Rome, St. Anthers served for only forty-three days (21st November, A.D. 235 – 3rd January, A.D. 236 before he was martyred. He was buried in the Catacomb of Pope St. Kallistos I (14th October) one of the Catacombs of Rome on the Appian Way. During his brief pontificate, St. Antherus began the practice of saving documents relating to the early martyrs, which in time grew into the Vatican library.
  • BERTILIA, a noblewoman, who even in youth was noted for her piety and charity. Following the death of her husband, St. Bertilia lived as an anchoress near the church of Saint Amandus of Maastricht, at Maroeuil (Marolles) in Flanders, which she had previously founded. St. Bertilia reposed circa A.D. 687.
  • BLITMUND, a monk and disciple of St. Attalas (10th March) at Bobbio. St. Blitmund accompanied St. Valéry (1st April) to Picardy where they founded an abbey at present-day Saint-Valery-sur-Somme, France, later called abbaye Saint-Valery. St. Blitmund later served as its Abbot. He reposed circa A.D. 660.
  • DANIEL, a deacon to St. Prosdocimus (7th November), the first Bishop of Padua. He was either a convert from Judaism or of Jewish ancestry. St. Daniel was martyred for spreading the gospel in A.D. 168.
  • FINLUGH (FINLAG), (Sixth Century), a brother of St. Fintan (vide infra), St. Finlugh left his native Ireland. He travelled to Scotland where it is thought he became a disciple of St. Columba of Iona (9th June). He later returned to Ireland to serve as abbot of a monastery founded by St. Columba of Iona in Co. Derry.
  • FINTAN, (Sixth Century), a brother of St. Finlugh (vide supra), and disciple of St. Comgall (10th May) at Bangor. St. Fintan is the patron saint of Doon in Ireland where his holy well still exists.
  • FLORENTIUS of VIENNE, (Third Century), an early Bishop of Vienne, renowned for his holiness of life and erudition. St. Florentius was exiled and martyred for the Faith, circa A.D. 253.


  • Icon of St. Geneviève of Paris

  • GENEVIÈVE, as a child St. Geneviève met St. Germanus of Auxerre (31st July) who foretold her future sanctity, and at the age of fifteen, she received monastic tonsure. St. Geneviève had the gift of clairvoyance, which at times led many around her to persecute her until the Bishop of Paris came to her defence. When Paris was under attack by the Franks and later by Attila and the Huns, St. Geneviève encouraged those defending the city, and organised groups to pray for God’s protection. St. Geneviève reposed in A.D. 500, and ever since has been considered the special protectress and patroness of Paris.
  • WENOG, (Date Unknown), an early Welsh saint about whom there is no information extant.


  • 16th January:

  • DUNCHAID O'BRAOIN, a native of Westmeath in Ireland, he was an anchorite near the monastery of Clonmacnoise until A.D. 969, when he became their abbot. It is believed that St. Dunchaid O’Braoin returned to the hermetic life for the last few years before reposing A.D. 988.
  • FERREOLUS (FERGÉOL), a Bishop of Grenoble who was martyred whilst preaching circa A.D. 670.
  • FULGENTIUS, a Spanish noble and one of the leaders of the Church in the Iberian Peninsula of that era. St. Fulgentius served as Bishop of Ecija (Astigi) in Andalusia and was the brother of SS. Isidore (4th April) and Leander (27th February) of Seville, and of St. Florentina (20th June). He reposed circa A.D. 633. His feast is universally listed as the 16th of January, with the exception of the Bollandists who list 14th January in the Acta Sanctorum.


  • Icon of St. Fursey

  • FURSEY, St. Fursey was an Irish monk who did much to establish Christianity throughout the British Isles, particularly in East Anglia. The son of St. Fintan, and grandson of Finlog, pagan king of the area, his mother was Gelges, the Christian daughter of Áed-Finn, king of Connaught. He was most likely baptised by St. Brendan the Voyager (16th May), his father’s uncle, and later educated by St. Brendan’s monks. St. Fursey was tonsured at Inisquin (near Galway) and devoted himself to monastic life. He later built his own monastery at Rathmat, (according to St. Bede the Venerable (25th May) this was inspired by a vision he had) in the Diocese of Tuam, now Kill-Fursa, serving as its first abbot. In time, his brothers SS. Foillan (9th January) and Ultan (2nd May) joined the community at Rathmat, though by this point St. Fursey seems to have renounced the administration of the monastery, and devoted himself to preaching throughout the area, as well as the frequent exorcism of evil spirits.
  • Around A.D. 633, he, along with his brothers SS. Foillan (9th January) and Ultan (2nd May), travelled to East Anglia. There he was received by King St. Sigebert (25th January), who gave him a tract of land at Cnobheresburg on which he built a monastery within the enclosure of a Roman fort — Burghcastle in Suffolk — surrounded by woods and overlooking the sea. Here he laboured for several years converting the Picts and Saxons. He also tonsured King St. Sigebert into the monastic state. Once again, he sought the hermetic life and withdrew with St. Ultan to live as an anchorite. About a year later war threatened East Anglia, and St. Fursey disbanded his monks and sailed with his brothers and six other monks to Gaul, arriving in Normandy in A.D. 648. Once there, through the generosity of Clovis II, he built the great monastery of Lagny, approximately 25 km east of the present centre of Paris. At one point St. Fursey was deputed by the Bishop of Paris to govern his Diocese as his vicar general, which has led to some describing him as a Bishop himself.

    St. Fursey reposed A.D. 650 at Froheins (Fursei-domus), whilst he was building another monastery at Peronne. His relics have been famous for miracles, and are still preserved in the great church at Peronne. St. Fursey is the patron saint of Peronne, and patron saint of the Parish of Headford.

  • HONORATUS (HONORAT, HONORÉ) of ARLES, born in northern Gaul to a pagan as a young man St. Honoratus embraced Christianity and when to live and study monasticism in Greece, Egypt, and the Holy Land. Upon his return to Gaul, St. Honoratus founded Lérins Abbey on the Mediterranean island of the same name, serving as its first Abbot. In A.D. 426 he was forced to accept consecration as the Archbishop of Arles. Although he reposed three years later, during that brief period, St. Honoratus was able to re-establish orthodoxy to his see, fighting against the Arian and Manichaean heresies.
  • HONORATUS of FONDI, (Sixth Century), the founding-abbot of the monastery at Fondi at Lazio (present-day Italy). St. Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September) wrote a brief life of St. Honoratus.
  • JAMES of TARENTAISE, a native of Syria who received monastic tonsure and became a disciple of St. Honoratus (vide supra) at Lérins Abbey. St. James later evangelised Savoy where he served as first Bishop of Moûtiers (Tarentaise). He reposed circa A.D. 429.
  • LIBERATA, (Fifth Century), a nun and sister of SS. Epiphanius of Pavia (21st January), and Honorata (11th January).
  • MARCELLUS, (On Eastern Calendars 7th June), the thirtieth Pope of Rome from mid A.D. 308 until he was forced into exile for his defence of the Faith in early A.D. 309. St. Marcellus reposed shortly thereafter, and was immediately venerated as a saint. His relics are under the altar of San Marcello al Corso in Rome.
  • PRISCILLA, (First Century), it is at St. Pricilla’s villa that St. Peter the Apostle (29th June) is traditionally believed to have made his headquarters in Rome. She is also widely thought to have been the mother of St. Pudens the Senator (19th May).
  • TITIAN, a Roman noble, and priest who served as treasurer of the now extinct diocese of Oderzo, near Venice, under Bishop Floriano. When Floriano was assigned to another diocese, St. Titian was selected to replace him by popular acclaim. St. Titian was a noted preacher, fought against the Arian heresy, and was a model Shepard of his flock for the thirty years he served the See. St. Titian reposed in A.D. 650.
  • TRIVERIUS, from his youth, St. Triverius lived as a hermit first near an abbey in Thérouanne, Pas-de-Calais, and later near to the present-day village of Saint-Trivier-sur-Moignans (formerly Saint-Trivier-en-Dombes) in Auvergne which is named for him. St. Triverius reposed in A.D. 550.
  • VALERIUS, a hermit for most of his life, St. Valerius was well-known for his wisdom and holiness of life. This led to the people of the Diocese of Sorrento proclaiming him to be their bishop, a position which, with great reluctance, he accepted. St. Valerius reposed in A.D. 453.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2112-2017  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume I. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.






All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!