25 August, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
25th August (NS)12th August (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


12th August:

  • CASSIAN of BENEVENTO, believed to have been a Bishop of Benevento in the south of present-day Italy who reposed circa A.D. 340. However, he does not appear in any contemporary lists of bishops of that See.
  • EUPLUS, martyred in the Sicilian city of Catania (A.D. 304) for possession of, and preaching the, Gospel to the pagan population.

    TROPARION of THE MARTYR and ARCHDEACON EUPLIUS of CATANIA —TONE IV
    As a holy deacon and righteous minister of the Church of Christ,
    You contended superbly.
    You sailed over the sea of many torments and afflictions,
    O all-bless Euplus.
    Guide us into the haven of heaven.

    KONTAKION of THE MARTYR and ARCHDEACON EUPLIUS of CATANIA —TONE I
    When the love of Christ was your only defence,
    You stood in the midst of your fight and said:
    I endure this struggle willingly and with confidence!
    You rejoiced, O Euplus, to offer your head to the sword and so complete your course!
  • EUSEBIUS of MILAN, a native of Greece, St. Eusebius served as the nineteenth Bishop of Milan (circa A.D. 449 – 462). In A.D. 451, he convened a Council in Milan, where the Tome of Leo was read and approved, hence this local council affirmed the Fourth Ecumenical Council’s condemnation of Eutyches' Christological heresy.
  • GRACILIAN and FELICISSIMA, according to tradition, St. Gracilian, whilst in prison awaiting martyrdom miraculously restored the sight of St. Felicissima. He then Baptised St. Felicissima. They were martyred by beheading on the same day in the early fourth century.
  • HERCULANUS of BRESCIA, a Bishop of Brescia in Lombardy who reposed circa A.D. 550. No further information on his life is extant.
  • HILARIA, DIGNA, EUPREPIA, EUNOMIA, QUIRIACUS, LARGIO, CRESCENTIAN, NIMMIA, JULIANA and COMPANIONS, (Fourth Century), a group of twenty-nine Christians in Augburg who were martyred in the last of the persecutions of Diocletian and Maximian. St. Hilaria was the mother of St. Afra of Augsburg (5th August), and was burned alive, along with her three maids, Digna, Euprepia, and Eunomia, as they prayed at St. Afra’s tomb. The balance of these martyrs were killed in riots led by pagan mobs.
  • JANBERT, an Abbot of St. Augustine’s Abbey and successor of St. Bregwin (24th August) as fourteenth Archbishop of Canterbury (A.D. 765). He reposed A.D. 792, and is buried at Canterbury Cathedral.
  • MEREWENNA, (Date Uncertain), said to have been a daughter of King St. Brychan of Brycheiniog (6th April), St. Merewenna is the patron saint of Marham Church near Bude, Cornwall, England. According to some sources she is the same saint as St. Morwenna (8th July), also a daughter of St. Brychan.
  • PORCARIUS (PORCHAIRE) and 500 COMPANIONS, St. Porcarius was Abbot of Lérins when he was warned by an angel in a vision that the monastery was about to be attacked. He immediately sent off by ship all the young students, as well as thirty-six of the younger monks. Soon afterwards the monastery was attacked by Saracens, and the entire community of five hundred were massacred (circa A.D. 732).
  • UST (JUSTUS), (Date Unknown), the patron of the church of St. Just near Penzance, and the town of St. Just, Cornwall, England is named for him. Some accounts state that he was a hermit, others a martyr, and still others claim he was a bishop. It is most likely there were two or more saints of the same name in Brittany, Wales, and Cornwall in the fifth or sixth century. However, the lack of reliable information makes it impossible to state with any amount of certainty specific details of his life.


  • 25th August:

  • AREDIUS (YRIEIX, YRIEZ), abbot of Limoges, and chancellor to Theudebert II, King of Austrasia. St. Aredius was the founder of a monastery south of Limoges that is now called Saint-Yrieix, and is the namesake for the various French towns and villages called St. Yrieix. St. Aredius reposed A.D. 591.
  • EBBA THE ELDER, St. Ebba the Elder was a sister of SS. Oswald (5th August) and Oswin (20th August) and received monastic tonsure at Lindisfarne. She went on to become the founding Abbess of the double monastery at Coldingham in Scotland. St. Ebba maintained friendships with SS. Cuthbert (20th March) and Adamnán of Iona (23rd September), and was the spiritual mother of St. Etheldreda (23rd June). St. Ebba reposed A.D. 683.

  • TROPARION of ST. EBBA THE ELDER — TONE VIII
    In thee, O mother, that which is fashioned according to the image of
    God was preserved; for, having taken up thy cross, thou didst follow
    Christ, and by thine example didst teach that the flesh is to be
    disdained as passing, but that the soul must be cared for as a thing
    immortal. Wherefore, thy spirit doth rejoice with the angels,
    O venerable Ebba.

  • EUSEBIUS, PONTIAN, VINCENT, and PEREGRINUS, martyrs at Rome under Commodus (circa A.D. 192) whose relics were translated to France in the ninth century A.D.
  • GENESIUS (GENÈS) of ARLES, a notary in Arles, who, when an imperial decree ordering the persecution of Christians was read in his presence, he declared himself to be a Christian and fled. He was captured and martyred (circa A.D. 303).
  • GENESIUS THE ACTOR, an actor who, after having performed several plays mocking Christianity, had a conversion experience, proclaimed his faith in Christ. St. Genesius, even when facing torture and death, refused to renounce his faith, and was martyred. This even took place during the reign of Diocletian (A.D. 284 - 305).
  • GERUNTIUS of ITALICA, (First Century), a missionary in Spain during the first century A.D. who is believed to have served as Bishop of Talco (Seville), and been martyred.
  • GREGORY of UTRECHT, a disciple of St. Boniface (5th June). Following the martyrdom of St. Boniface, St. Gregory assumed leadership of the Church of Utrecht. He has always been styled Bishop of Utrecht, though it is unclear whether he actually received Episcopal consecration. St. Gregory reposed A.D. 781.
  • HUNEGUND, having been betrothed against her will, whilst on a pilgrimage to Rome, with her bridegroom, she was released from her marital vows and received monastic tonsure from Pope St. Vitalian (27th January). After returning to France she entered the abbey at Homblieres where she spent the rest of her life, reposing A.D. 690.
  • MAGINUS (MAXIMUS), a hermit, and wonder-worker, in the mountains near Tarragonia in Spain. He was beheaded circa A.D. 304. The name Magi, which is common is Tarragonia, maybe derived from his name.
  • MARCIAN of SAIGNON, a native of Saignon in the department of Vaucluse in southern France. St. Marcian was the founding abbot of the Abbey of St. Eusebius, Saignon, in the Diocese of Apt, and reposed A.D. 485.
  • NEMESIUS and LUCILLA, Nemesius, a deacon, and Lucilla, his daughter, are numbered amongst those Christians martyred in Rome under the Emperor Valerian (A.D. 254 - 260).
  • PATRICIA, a noblewoman from Constantinople, possibly related to the imperial family, fled to Rome in order to escape marriage. Whilst in Rome she recieved monastic tonsure. returning to Constantinople, she renounced any claim to the imperial crown, and distributed her wealth to the poor. St. Patricia then set out on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, however her ship encountered a storm and she was shipwrecked on the shores of Naples, shortly afterwards she succmbed to disease and reposed circa A.D. 665. St. Patricia is one of the patron-saints of Naples.
  • WANNUS (GUARINUS, WARREN), (Seventh Century), the son of St. Sigrada (8th August), and brother St. Leodegarius (2nd October). St. Wannus was martyred by stoning, under Ebroin the Frankish mayor of the palace of Neustria, near Arras, France, A.D. 676.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








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24 August, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
24th August (NS)11th August (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


11th August:

  • ATTRACTA (ATHRACHT), (Fifth Century), St. Attracta is believed to have been a contemporary of St. Patrick (17th March), from whom it is thought she received monastic tonsure. She went on to found monasteries in Co. Sligo and Co. Roscommon. St. Attracta was renowned for her charity and the hospitality she extended to travellers and the homeless.
  • CHROMATIUS, (Third Century), the father of St. Tiburtius (vide infra) the martyr. Whilst Praefectus Urbi of Rome, St. Chromatius was converted to Christianity by St. Tranquillinus (6th July) and baptised by St. Polycarp (23rd February).
  • DIGNA, (Fourth Century), an anchoress in the mountains near Todi in Umbria during the Diocletian persecution.
  • EQUITIUS (EQUIZIO), greatly influenced St. Benedict (11th July), he was the founder of a number of monasteries in the region of Valeria Suburbicaria (present-day L'Aquila-Rieti-Tivoli, Italy). St. Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September) speaks highly of him in his Dialogues. St. Equitius reposed at the monastery of San Lorenzo di Pizzoli circa A.D. 570.
  • GAUGERICUS (GAU, GÉRY), a native of Trier, who became a priest, and was consecrated Bishop of Cambrai-Arras circa A.D. 585. He also assisted at the Council of Paris, October A.D. 614. St. Gaugericus reposed circa A.D. 625 after an episcopate of thirty-nine years.
  • LELIA, (Date Unknown), there is no recorded information on the life of St. Lelia, though observances of her feast have been documented for hundreds of years. There are several places in Ireland whose names are derived from Lelia, including Killeely (Cill Liadaini), Co. Limerick.
  • RUFINUS and COMPANIONS, (Date Unknown), there is a St Rufinus, Bishop of the Marsi, and his companions, martyred under Emperor Maximinus listed in the Roman Martyrology on 11th August. However, he is in all likelihood the same as the St. Rufinus (of Assisi) listed on 30th July.
  • SUSANNA, the daughter of St. Gainus (19th February) and niece of Caius, variously identified as either Pope St. Caius (22 April) or Caius, Presbyter of Rome. St. Susanna was beheaded by order of Diocletian, also a relative, in St. Gainus’ house circa A.D. 295. The house in which she was martyred, as well as the one next door, belonging to her uncle, were converted into a church which later became St. Susanna ad duas domos in Rome. For reasons no longer known she is frequently grouped with St. Tiburtius (vide infra) on calendars, though there is no connexion between them.
  • TAURINUS, traditionally counted as the first Bishop of Evreux in Normandy. He reposed circa A.D. 410 – 412, there is no further information extant.
  • TIBURTIUS, the only son of St. Chromatius (vide supra). During the persecution of Christians under Diocletian, St. Tiburtius was martyred by beheading at the third mile-stone of the Via Lavicana A.D. 286. He is mentioned in the legends of St. Sebastian (20th January) who is said to have been his Godfather. St. Tiburtius was entombed in the Inter duas lauros cemetery on the Via Lavicana. For reasons no longer known he is frequently grouped with St. Susanna (vide supra) on calendars, though there is no connexion between them.


  • 24th August:

  • AUREA, from the many accounts of the life of St. Aurea it may be deduced that after being subjected to a multitude of tortures, she was martyred by being thrown into the sea at Ostia near Rome circa A.D. 270.
  • AUDOENUS, (AUDEON, OUEN, OWEN, DADO), whilst serving in various high offices at the Courts of Clotaire and Dagobert, St. Audoenus met and formed a close friendship with St. Eligius (1st December). They resolved to enter the Church and together were consecrated bishops; St. Eligius of Noyon, and St. Audoenus succeeding St. Romanus (23rd October) at Rouen. St. Audoenus served his See for over forty years, doing much to promote Christianity and was acclaimed a saint shortly after his repose, at Clichy, A.D. 683.
  • BREGWIN, little is known of the life of St. Bregwin, as there are no contemporary records extant, though some of his letters to St. Lull of Mainz (16th October) still survive. His Life by Eadmer, a twelfth century English historian, theologian, ecclesiastic, and bishop, offers little more than the dates of his tenure as the twelfth Archbishop of Canterbury, and allusions to ‘many miracles’. St. Bregwin reposed A.D. 764; he was buried in the Chapel of St. John the Baptist at the East end of Canterbury Cathedral.
  • PATRICE (PATRICK, PATRICIUS), (Date Unknown), though his is listed on this date in the old Roman Martyrology as an Abbot of Nevers in present-day France, there is nothing definitively known about him, and he has been deleted from more recent martyrologies.
  • PATRICK, this saint is known as St. Patrick the Elder to differentiate him from his celebrated namesake and possible relative, St. Patrick of Ireland (17th March). Few details of his life are known to us. It is variously reported that he reposed (circa A.D. 450) at Kilkenny, Co. Kilkenny in Ireland, or at Glastonbury, Somerset, in England, though it seems that at some point his relics were enshrined at Glastonbury. Neither of these Irish St. Patricks are to be confused with the St. Patrick (vide supra), Abbot of Nevers in France, who is also commemorated on 24th August.
  • PTOLEMY, (First Century),a disciple of the Apostle Peter (29th June) who sent him to evangelise the people of Tuscany. He was martyred in Nepi.
  • ROMANUS of NEPI, a Bishop and martyr of Nepi in Tuscany. He is generally considered to have been a disciple of St. Ptolemy (vide supra), and also was sent by the Apostle Peter (29th June).
  • SANDRATUS (SANDRADUS), a monk of the monastery of St. Maximinus at Trier, who was sent by the Emperor Otto I to institute needed reforms to the monastery of St. Gall (A.D. 972). Having successfully completed that mission, St. Sandratus was made Abbot of Gladbach and Abbot of Weissenburg.
  • YRCHARD (IRCHARD, YARCARD), (Fifth Century), St. Yrchard was a disciple of St. Ternan (12th June) who consecrated him missionary bishop to work amongst the Picts. Nothing further about St. Yrchard is known to us.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








23 August, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
23rd August (NS)10th August (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


10th August:

  • AGUILBERTE, the second Abbess of Jouarre, she reposed circa A.D. 680.
  • AREDIUS (ARIDIUS, AREGIUS), Archbishop of Lyons from A.D. 603 until his repose A.D. 615. He was a highly regarded theologian who actively fought against heterodoxy.
  • ASTERIA (HESTERIA), a martyr (circa A.D. 307) venerated since time immemorial in Bergamo in Lombardy. According to ancient tradition she was beheaded under Diocletian. She is also associated with St. Grata (1st May) in the burial of the holy martyr Alexander (26th August).
  • BASSA, PAULA, and AGATHONICA, (Date Unknown), nothing is known of these three maidens, other than the have been listed for generations as martyrs at Carthage in North Africa.
  • BETTELIN (BERTRAM), (Eighth Century), in the Anglican Church of the Holy Cross at Ilam, Staffordshire, is the Chapel of St. Bertram, built in 1618 by the Meverell, Port, and Hurt families. The chapel holds the remains and shrine of St. Bertram, an Anglo-Saxon saint, whose existence is entirely legendary. All the information on St. Bertram, or Bettelin, seems to come from a Life in the 1516 edition of the Nova Legenda Angliæ. St. Bertram is described as a seventh or eighth century Mercian King who renounced his title and wealth, and abandoned the world. He became a hermit in the area that is present-day Stafford, of which he is patron saint. This Life is confused and intertwined with that of St. Bettelin (9th September), and it is possible, if not probable, that they are one and the same person.

  • TROPARION of ST. BERTRAM of STAFFORD - TONE VIII
    Like newborn lambs are we lacking in any defense, unable to
    withstand the onslaughts of the spiritual wolves who seek ever
    devour us; but do thou, O righteous Bertram, come unto our aid,
    and with the staff of God's grace which abideth in thee drive far
    from us the savage minions of Satan, that by thine entreaties we
    may find safety and rest in the fold of Christ in paradise.

  • BLANE (BLAAN, BLAIN), (Sixth Century), according to the Aberdeen Breviary St. Blane was a disciple of SS. Comgall (10th May) and Kenneth (11th October). He was consecrated Bishop of Kingarth in the Isle of Bute in Scotland at the end of the sixth or beginning of the seventh century A.D. St. Blane was buried at Dunblane, where the Cathedral and several churches are dedicated to his honour. However, there is debate regarding the dates generally given for his life. If, as it is thought, he was a disciple of SS. Comgall and Kenneth then his birth must have been after A.D. 550. However, Butler, and Dempster insist that he flourished in the tenth or eleventh century, perhaps confusing St. Kenneth with King Kenneth († circa A.D. 1000). The Bollandists reject the theory that St. Blane studied under of SS. Comgall and Kenneth. This leads to the contemporary hypothesis that there were two different St. Blanes, one who lived in the sixth century A.D., and a second who lived in the eleventh century A.D.
  • DEUSDEDIT, (Sixth Century), a poor shoemaker in Rome. According to St. Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September), who was a contemporary, each Saturday, St. Deusdedit gave away to the poor all that he had earned during the week beyond the minimum necessary for basic sustenance.
  • GERONTIUS (GERAINT), (Sixth Century), St. Gerontius was a King of Dumnonia (present-day Devon England) who fell in battle against the pagan Saxons (circa A.D. 508). Numerous romantic legends evolved about his life and that of his wife, Enid, all of doubtful veracity. The first known mention of him is in the 12th century Exeter Martyrology, which refers to a King Gerontius, though not as a saint. An Exeter Litany attributed to Bishop Leofric of Exeter (+c. A.D. 1072) mentions a St. Gerontius. Another Gerontius, a King of Cornwall who reposed A.D. 596, is listed as a saint in some works, though without a feast date, and may be the same person. A modern Bollandist has speculated that the first Gerontius was a local saint who was elevated to the status of king in the writings of later hagiographers.

    TROPARION of ST. GERAINT — TONE VIII
    Thou wast a Confessor for the Faith, a friend and father of saints
    and a wise and pious king, O holy Geraint.
    Even in the Age of Saints thy virtues shone forth, O righteous one,
    and as thou wast a shining beacon guiding thy subjects in Devon into the way of salvation,
    intercede we beseech thee, with Christ our God,
    for those who call upon thee, that He will save their souls.

  • LAURENCE of ROME, the holy, glorious and right-victorious Archdeacon and Martyr St. Laurence was an archdeacon of the Church of Rome as well as a companion of Pope Martyr Sixtus II (6th August), both of whom were martyred under persecution by the Emperor Valerian (A.D. 258). Little is known about St. Laurence’s life. According to legend he was a native of Northern Spain, and possible accompanied Pope Martyr Sixtus to Rome when he was elevated to Bishop of that See. The Basilica of San Lorenzo in Panisperna was built over the place of his martyrdom
    Icon of St. Laurence of Rome

    TROPARION of MARTYR and ARCHDEACON LAURENCE of ROME — TONE IV
    Victorious martyr of Christ our God,
    by the sign of the Cross you gave sight to the blind;
    you distributed the riches of the Church to the poor;
    you were tried by fire and no evil was found in you.
    As you endured the burning,
    may your prayers extinguish the flames of our many sins,
    blessed Archdeacon Lawrence!

    KONTAKION of MARTYR and ARCHDEACON LAURENCE of ROME — TONE II
    Your heart burned with divine fire
    as the flames of the passions died within you.
    God-bearing martyr Lawrence, the pillar of those who struggle,
    you cried out in the midst of your contest:
    "Nothing can separate me from the love of Christ."
  • MARTYRS of ROME, one hundred and sixty-five Christian soldiers martyred in Rome under Aurelian A.D. 274.
  • THIENTO (THIENTE) and COMPANIONS, an Abbot of Kloster Wessobrunn near Weilheim in Bavaria, who was martyred, along with six of his monks, by invading Magyars of Hungary, A.D. 955.


  • 23rd August:

  • ALTIGIANUS and HILARINUS, two monks martyred by the Saracens at Saint-Seine in Burgundy A.D. 731.
  • EBBA (ÆBBA) THE YOUNGER and COMPANIONS, St. Ebba the Younger was Abbess of Coldingham, an abbey in the Scottish Borders, which had been founded two centuries prior by St. Ebba the Elder (25th August). During a Viking raid on Scotland in A.D. 879, St. Ebba mutilated her nose and upper lip with a razor, in the hopes of discouraging the invaders from raping her. With her encouragement, the entire community followed suit. The act is one of the possible origins of the expression ‘cutting off the nose to spite the face’. While it did result in revolting the Vikings, they set fire to the monastery in retaliation, killing the entire community.

  • TROPARION of ST. EBBA THE YOUNGER — TONE I
    Having finished your course and kept the Faith unto the end
    In the agony of immolation ye died for Christ
    The Lamb and Shepherd, slain as reason-endowed ewe-lambs
    Wherefore, magnifying Him with joyous soul
    We celebrate your holy memory today,
    O right wondrous and glorious Ebba
    and all those of thy flock who suffered with thee.

  • EUGENE (EOGHAN, EUNY, OWEN), born in Leinster, Ireland, St. Eugene spent a great deal of time missionising, with great success both in Britain and on the Continent. He returned to his native land where he was consecrated the first Bishop of Ardstraw, which later became the See of Derry of which St. Eugene is patron saint. St. Eugene reposed circa A.D. 618.
  • FLAVIAN (FLAVINIAN, FLAVIUS) of AUTUN, the twenty-first Bishop of Autun. It is generally believed he lived in the first half of the seventh century
  • MINERVIUS, ELEAZAR and COMPANIONS, although the extant details leave much to be desired; it is fairly safe to say SS. Minervius and Eleazar, along with eight children, were martyred at Lyons in the early third century A.D.
  • QUIRIACUS, MAXIMUS, ARCHELAUS, and COMPANIONS, St. Quiriacus, Bishop of Ostia; Maximus, a priest; and Archelaus, a deacon; along with an unknown number of Christian soldiers seem to have been martyred at Ostia. The Roman Martyrology places their martyrdom during the reign of Alexander Severus (A.D. 222 – 235), however contemporary scholarship places it at some time after A.D. 255.
  • TYDFIL, according to legend, St. Tydfil was a daughter of King St. Brychan of Brycheiniog (6th April). She is said to have been martyred, with others, circa A.D. 480, by marauding Picts and Saxons at the location now known as Merthyr Tydfil in Mid Glamorgan, Wales.
  • VICTOR VITENSIS (VICTOR of VITA), a Bishop of Vita, in the Roman Province of Byzacena (present-day Tunisia). He is mainly remembered for the Historia persecutionis Africanae Provinciae, temporibus Geiserici et Hunirici regum Wandalorum, his eyewitness accounts of the suffering afflicted upon orthodox Christians of northern Africa by the Arian Vandals. St. Victor was banished by the Vandals and reposed in exile on the Island of Sardinia at the beginning of the sixth century A.D.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








22 August, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
22nd August (NS)9th August (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


9th August:

  • AMOR (AMOUR), (Date Unknown), venerated in Franche-Comté, France with St. Viator (21st October). Their relics are enshrined at Saint-Amour in Burgundy.
  • AUTOR (ADINCTOR, AUTEUR), (Fifth Century), the thirteenth Bishop of Metz in France. His relics were translated to Marmoutier Abbey in Alsace in A.D. 830.
  • BANDARIDUS (BANDERIK, BANDERY) Bishop of Soissons in France from A.D. 540 until his repose in A.D. 566, though he was exiled from his See from A.D. 547 - 544. During exile, St. Bandaridus worked anonamously as gardener in an English Abbey. He also was the founder of the Abbey of St. Crispin, where he was buried.
  • DOMITIAN of CHÂLONS, (Date Uncertain), the third Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne. He was known for his zeal and success in converting heathens. St. Domitian was buried in the same grave as his predecessor, St. Donatian (7th August).
  • FIRMUS and RUSTICUS, (Third Century), prominent citizens of Bergamo, scourged and beheaded for refusing to sacrifice to pagan idols under the Emperor Maximinian at Verona. Their relics are enshrined in Bergamo and Verona.
  • NATHY (DAVID), (Sixth Century), A disciple of St. Finian of Clonard (12th December), St. Nathy went on to be the founding abbot of a monastery at Achonry, Co. Sligo, Ireland. It has been said that he was consecrated bishop, however, Colgan and all other reputable sources list him as a priest. Though renowned for the austerity of his life, he was even more celebrated for the loving kindness he showed to the poor. St. Nathy reposed at an advanced age, circa A.D. 600, and is the patron saint of the Irish diocese of Achonry.
  • NUMIDICUS and COMPANIONS, a group of martyrs burnt at the stake at Carthage during the Decian persecution, circa A.D. 251. One tradition states Numidicus was dragged still breathing out of the ashes of the funeral pyre and was ordained priest, possibly by St. Cyprian (16th September).
  • PHELIM (FIDLEMINUS), (Sixth Century), An Irish priest, St. Phelim is reputed to have been a disciple of St. Columba (9th June). He lived as a hermit and over time the town of Kilmore, Co. Cavan, of which he is the main patron saint, grew around his cell.
  • ROMANUS OSTIARIUS, an early martyr (A.D. 258) in Rome. Though the details of his life are unclear, one tradition has him as a companion in the martyrdom of St. Laurence of Rome (10th August), and buried in the Catacomb of the Cyriaca on the Via Tiburtina.
  • RUSTICUS, (Fourth Century?), a martyr at Sirmium in Pannonia of whom no other details are extant.
  • SECUNDIAN, MARCELLIAN, and VERIAN, martyred Cività Vecchia in Italy, under the Emperor Decius (AD 250). Secundian is thought to have been a prominent official, whilst the others are said to have been “Scholastics”.
  • SERENUS, the tenth Bishop of Marseilles in France, circa A.D. 595 until his repose circa A.D. 600. He is mentioned in several letters of Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September).


  • 22nd August:

  • ANDREW of TUSCANY, an Irishman who, along with his sister St. Brigid (1st February), studied under St. Donatus (22nd October). St. Andrew accompanied St. Donatus to Italy, and when the later was appointed Bishop of Fiesole, he ordained St. Andrew to the deaconate. St. Andrew served as St. Donatus’ Archdeacon, restored the church of San Martino di Mensola and founded a monastery there. St. Andrew reposed shortly after St. Donatus, circa A.D. 880.
  • ANTONINUS, a public executioner in Rome, who proclaimed himself a Christian after having a vision of angels. As a result of his conversion St. Antoninus was beheaded A.D. 186.
  • ARNULF, (Eighth or Ninth Century), There is no reliable historical information on the life of St. Arnulf, and his existence may be entirely apocryphal. One legend states that he was a hermit near St. Neots, Cambridgeshire, England. Another possibility is that the existence of St. Arnulf is nothing more than a legend which grew up around a French tradition that the relics of St. Arnulf of Metz (18th July) were translated to England.
  • ETHELGITHA, St. Ethelgitha was an abbess of a convent in Northumbria, England who reposed circa A.D. 720. Nothing further is known of her life.
  • FABRICIAN and PHILIBERT, (Date Unknown), said to have been martyrs in Toledo, Spain, however, there is no information on their lives extent.
  • GUNIFORT, (Date Unknown), a native of either Scotland or Ireland, St. Gunifort, his brother, and two of his sisters, left the British Isles, on a pilgrimage to Pavia. The sisters were martyred in Germany, his brother at Como. St. Gunifort, though injured, escaped Como, and reached Pavia, where he succumbed to his wounds. Though the exact year of his martyrdom is unknown, it has been conjectured it took place under Maximian Herculeus, which would place it circa A.D. 300.
  • HIPPOLYTUS of PORTO, there are many contradictory versions of the life of St. Hippolytus. That which is most accepted is he was born in Arabia; a disciple of St. Irenaeus of Lyons (28th June), or more likely, Clement of Alexandria; that upon coming to Rome he was consecrated Bishop of Porto; and that he was martyred by drowning during the reign of Alexander Severus (A.D. 222 – 235).
  • MARTIAL, EPICTETUS, MAPRILIS, FELIX, and COMPANIONS, often referred to as the “Pilgrim Martyrs” they were a group of Christians on a pilgrimage to Rome, who were martyred at Porto near Rome, either on the way to, on their return from, Rome.
  • MAURUS and COMPANIONS, St. Maurus and a group of forty-nine of fellow Christians who were martyred for the faith at Rheims in north-eastern Gaul. Whilst traditionally their martyrdom has been said to have taken place during the reign of Emperor Valerian (A.D. 253 – 260), some contemporary scholars argue for dating it during the reign of Emperor Diocletian (A.D. 284 – 305).
  • SIGFRID, a disciple of St. Benedict Biscop (12th January) at Wearmouth Abbey, St. Sigfrid succeeded St. Eosterwine (7th March) as Abbot of Wearmouth. St. Sigfrid reposed in A.D. 688, and in time, his relics were enshrined with those of SS. Benedict Biscop and Eosterwine in the Abbey church.
  • SYMPHORIANUS, (Third Century), a Christian in Autun (present-day France), martyred for refusing to worship an idol.
  • TIMOTHY, (Date Unknown), a martyr in Rome of whom little definitive is known. The general consensus is that after protracted imprisonment and brutal scourging, St. Timothy was beheaded, near where the Basilica of St. Paul's outside the Walls now stands.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
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21 August, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
21st August (NS)8th August (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


8th August:

  • CYRIACUS, LARGUS, SMARAGDUS, and COMPANIONS, St. Cyriacus, a Deacon, along with SS. Largus, Smaragdus, and a group of more than twenty, are counted amongst the martyrs in Rome of the persecution under the Emperors Diocletian and Maximian Herculeus (A.D. 303).
  • ELLIDIUS (ILLOG), (Seventh Century), St. Ellidius appears to be the patron saint of Hirnant, the village church being the Parish of St. Illog, Montgomeryshire, Wales. He is also the patron of a church in the Scilly Islands. The name “St. Helen’s Isle” is an English corruption of the Cornish Enys Elidius.
  • GEDEON, nothing is known of his life other than he served as the thirteenth Bishop of Besançon in France from A.D. 790 until his repose A.D. 796.
  • LEOBALD (LEODEBOD), abbot of St-Aignan in Orléans, St. Leobald was the founder of Fleury Abbey, now known as Fleury-Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire. He resposed A.D. 650.
  • MUMMOLUS (MOMMOLUS, MOMMOLENUS), the second Abbot of Fleur, St. Mummolus had the relics of SS. Benedict (11th July) and Scholastica (10th February) translated from Italy. After which, the abbey became known as Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire.
  • RATHARD, a nobleman who after being ordained to the priesthood, built a church and monastery in Diessen, Bavaria, Germany. St. Rathard reposed A.D. 815.
  • SEVERUS, a priest, some say from India, who came to Vienne in Gaul to last of the Pagans in that region. St. Severus reposed circa A.D. 445.
  • SIGRADA, the Mother of SS. Warinus of Poitiers (25th August) and Leodegarius (2nd October), and Grandmother of St. Leudwinus (29th September). After the repose of her husband St Sigrada received monastic tonsure at Soissons in France. She reposed circa A.D. 678, shortly after her sons were martyred.
  • TERNATIUS (TERNISCUS), the eleventh Bishop of Besançon in eastern France near the Swiss border. St. Ternatius is said to have been an active supporter of monasticism, and charitable works. He reposed A.D. 680.
  • ULTAN, (Eighth Century), St. Ultan was an Irish priest at the monastery of St. Peter in Crayke, North Yorkshire, England. He was a highly regarded master of the art of illuminating manuscripts.


  • 21st August:

  • ANASTASIUS, an officer in the Roman Legion, inspired by the courage of the young St. Agapitus (18th August) as he endured torture, cried out: “The God of Agapitus is my God”. St. Anastasius was arrested by order of the Emperor Aurelian and put to death (A.D. 274) at Salone, about twenty kilometres (twelve miles) from Palestrina, near Rome.
  • AVITUS I of CLERMONT, the eighteenth Bishop of Clermont, and friend of St. Gregory of Tours (17th November), whom he ordained to the deaconate. St. Avitus reposed circa A.D. 600.
  • CYRIACA (DOMINICA), (Third Century), a widow in Rome and patroness of St. Laurence of Rome (10th August), who is believed to have used her home in Rome, to give food to the poor. St. Cyriaca was martyred A.D. 249.
  • EUPREPIUS, (First Century), according to tradition the first Bishop of Verona in the north of present-day Italy. Little that is factual is known about him, the common Veronese legend that St. Euprepius was one of the Seventy has no basis in fact.
  • LEONTIUS the ELDER, (Sixth Century), eighth Bishop of Bordeaux, and the predecessor of St. Leontius the Younger (11th July). St. Leontius reposed circa A.D. 541.
  • LUXORIUS, CISELLUS, and CAMERINUS, early-fourth century martyrs in Sardinia beheaded under Diocletian (A.D. 303). St. Luxorius had been a soldier in the imperial army, the other two were boys whom he encouraged by him to accept martyrdom rather than renounce Christ.
  • PATERNUS, a native of Alexandria who, while travelling through Italy, was arrested in Fondi, and reposed during his incarceration, circa A.D. 255.
  • PRIVATUS (PRIVAT), a third century Bishop of Mende in the Languedoc. Captured by Alemanni invaders, St. Privatus was subjected to barbaric tortures in the hopes that his flock would surrender. He refused to tell them to surrender and they refused to do so, and although the invaders gave up in the face of this resistance, St. Privatus succumbed to the injuries he sustained while being tortured and reposed A.D. 260.
  • QUADRATUS, a third century Bishop of Utica in North Africa. St. Quadratus and his flock were subjected to severe torture, but refused to renounce Christ, and were martyred. Their constancy of faith led to them being greatly revered by their fellow Christians throughout northern Africa.
  • SIDONIUS (APOLLINARIS), a native of Lyons, Caius Sollius Apollinaris Sidonius was a soldier, poet, diplomat, and lastly a bishop. He is one of the few Gallo-Roman aristocrats whose letters survive in quantity, leading one contemporary Antiquities scholar to call St. Sidonius “the single most important surviving author from fifth-century Gaul”. Though a wealthy, well-connected nobleman, and married to the daughter of the Emperor of the West, St. Sidonius gave his wealth to the poor. He was elected Bishop of Auvergne (Clermont, present-day Clermont-Ferrand) circa A.D. 470-472. When the city was besieged by the Goths in A.D. 474, St. Sidonius took an active part in its defence, and so was imprisoned when the city was captured. However, he was soon released by order of Euric, king of the Goths, and continued to serve his flock until his repose in A.D. 480.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








20 August, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
20th August (NS)7th August (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


7th August:

  • CARPOPHORUS, EXANTHUS, CASSIUS, SEVERINUS, SECUNDUS, and LICINIUS, soldiers martyred (circa A.D. 295) in Como in the north of Italy under Maximianus Herculius Augustus. According to one legend Carpophorus and Exanthus, were members of the legendary Theban Legion.
  • DONAT (DUNWYD), (Date Unknown), according to the English Menology St. Donat is the patron saint of St. Donat’s, or Llandunwyn, in the Vale of Glamorgan in Wales. There is no further information on his life extant.
  • DONATIAN, (Date Uncertain), disciple of and successor to St. Memmius (5th August), and second Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne in France.
  • DONATUS and HILARY (HILARINUS), (Fourth Century), St. Donatus, the second Bishop of Arezzo, and St. Hilary, a monk, were martyred under Julian the Apostate. St. Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September) amongst others have attributed numerous miracles to these saints.
  • DONATUS, a Frankish aristocrat, baptised by St. Columbanus (23rd November). He received monastic tonsure at Luxeuil, and in time consecrated Bishop of Besançon. A great supporter of monasticism, St. Donatus founded a monastery of St. Paul in Besançon. He is also known for the Regula Donati, a monastic rule he wrote for the community founded by his mother after she was widowed. St. Donatus reposed circa A.D. 660.
  • FAUSTUS, though there are no particulars of his life extant, tradition has it that he was a soldier who was tortured and eventually killed for the Faith in Milan during the reign of Commodus (A.D. 180 – A.D. 193).
  • PETER, JULIAN, and COMPANIONS, though listed in all of the ancient martyrologies, no details of their lives are extant. SS. Peter, Julian, and Companions are said to have been a group of at least twenty martyred in Rome under the persecutions of Valerian and Gallienus circa A.D. 260.
  • VICTRICIUS (VICTRICE), the son of a Roman legionnaire who followed his father into military service. However, after becoming a Christian, St. Victricius found military service incompatible with his Faith, and refused to continue his military service. He was flogged and sentenced to be executed, however the sentence was not carried out and he was discharged. St. Victricius became a missionary evangelising the people of Flanders, Hainault, and Brabant. He was consecrated the eighth Bishop of Rouen circa A.D. 386 or 393. He was, at one point, accused of heresy, and was defended from that charge by Pope Innocent I. St. Victricius was also known as an author and his works include De Laude Sanctorum, a short sermon he in 396 to welcome a gift of relics from St. Ambrose of Milan ((7th December)). St. Victricius reposed A.D. 417.


  • 20th August:

  • AMATOR (AMADOUR), (Date Unknown), legend states that St. Amator was the first hermit in Gaul. His cell, at Quercy, about 30 km (18.5 miles) south of Cahors, was a popular place of pilgrimage. In A.D. 1126 his relics were uncovered and found to be incorrupt.
  • BURCHARD, a native of Hesse who received monastic tonsure at Lobbes. St. Burchard was the author of a twenty volume series on Canon Law known as Decretum Burchardi. He was appointed by Emperor Otto III, and confirmed by Archbishop Willigis of Mainz, to the See of Worms in A.D. 1000. St. Burchard served the See of Worms until his repose in A.D. 1025, during which time he oversaw the creation of numerous monasteries and churches.
  • EDBERT, King St. Edbert succeeded St. Ceolwulf (15th January) to the throne of Northumbria in present-day England. After twenty years of a prosperous reign, he abdicated in favour of his son and retired to York, where his brother, Ecgbert, was Archbishop. St. Edbert entered the monastery attached to the cathedral and spent the remaining ten years of his life in prayer and penance. King St. Edbert reposed in A.D. 768, and was buried in the porch of the cathedral, alongside his brother who had reposed two years earlier.
  • HADUIN (HARDUIN), twelfth Bishop of Le Mans, and founder of several monasteries including Notre-Dame-d'Evron. St. Haduin reposed circa A.D. 662.
  • MEXME (MAXIMUS, MESME), in his Glory of the Confessors St. Gregory of Tours (17th November) tells of a disciple of St. Martin of Tours (11th November) by the name of Mexme, who, in the fifth century A.D. settled in a cave in Chinon as a hermit, and went on to found the first church there which served as the centre of a small monastery which became Chinon Abbey. St. Mexme reposed circa A.D. 470.


  • Icon of St. Oswin

  • OSWIN, (Seventh Century), King St. Oswin was a devout Christian and a close friend of St. Aidan of Lindisfarne (31st August). Following the repose of King St. Oswald (5th August), Northumbria was once again divided in two with King St. Oswin ascending to the throne of Deria, and his cousin Oswy to the throne of Bernicia. Nine years later, he was slain in battle against the forces of Oswy at Gilling near Richmond, Yorkshire, England, and King St. Oswin has since been honoured as a martyr. His tomb at Gilling became a place of pilgrimage until his relics were translated to Tynemouth Priory (about fifteen kilometres east of Newcastle upon Tyne), during the Viking invasions.

  • TROPARION of KING ST. OSWIN - TONE I
    Courtesy and humility shone from thee, O radiant Martyr Oswin.
    Trained by Saint Aidan as a Christian ruler, thou didst illumine
    northern Britain. Glory to Him Who has strengthened thee; glory to
    Him Who has crowned thee; glory to Him Who through thee works
    healings for all.


  • PHILIBERT, after being educated by St. Ouen (24th August), St. Philibert received monastic tonsure at Rebais Abbey and was promoted to Abbot at the tender age of twenty. Unfortunately, his lack of experience was too great to overcome and he resigned so that he could visit other monastic communities and study their Rules. In A.D. 654, he was given land by Clovis II on which he founded Jumièges Abbey. Before his repose in A.D. 684, St. Philibert founded several other monastic communities for both men and women, including the monastery of Noirmoutier. The Viking raid on Noirmoutier in A.D. 799 is the first recorded Viking raid on the Continent with the raiders sacking the monastery of Saint Philibert of Jumièges. The filbert derives its name from St. Philibert, since it ripens about 20th August in England.
  • PORPHYRIUS, (Date Unknown), said to have been a priest martyr in Palestrina near Rome. However, he is most likely apocryphal as the information on his life comes from the unreliable Acta of St. Agapitus of Palestrina.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?