29 September, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
29th September (NS)16th September (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


16th September:

  • ABUNDIUS, ABUNDANTIUS, MARCIAN, and JOHN, according to tradition SS. Abundius (a priest) and Abundantius (his deacon) had been condemned to death under Diocletian. On their way to execution they met St. Marcian, who was on his way to bury his recently deceased son St. John. St. Abundius prayed over St. John, raising him from the dead. This miracle caused both SS. Marcian and John to embrace Christianity, and they were immediately baptised. All four were subsequently beheaded circa A.D. 303. Marcian is one of the 140 Colonnade saints which adorn St. Peter's Square.
  • CORNELIUS, the twenty-first Pope of Rome (A.D. 251 – 253). The leading issues of his papacy were how the Church should respond to those who apostatised during persecution, but wished to return to the Church, and the Novatian Schism. Pope St. Cornelius was exiled (circa A.D. 252) to Centumcellae (present-day Civitavecchia north-west of Rome), where he reposed A.D. 253. Early records state he died from the hardships experienced in his exile, however, later sources claim he was beheaded.
  • CUNIBERT, the ninth Bishop of Cologne from A.D. 627 until his repose A.D. 663. Prior to his elevation to the episcopacy St. Cunibert served as Archdeacon of Trier.



  • CYPRIAN, born in North Africa, Thascius Cecilianus Cyprianus was a lawyer who was converted to Christianity at about the age of forty-six. Two years after his baptism, St. Cyprian was ordained to the priesthood, and shortly thereafter consecrated Bishop of Carthage (A.D. 248). St. Cyprian was an important figure on the side of Pope St. Cornelius (vide supra) during the Novatian Schism. A prolific author, St. Cyprian wrote a myriad of theological treatises, De Unitate Catholicae Ecclesiae undoubtedly being the most important of his works. One of the greatest of the Church Fathers, St. Cyprian was known for his compassion and fervour as a pastor. He was forced into hiding during the persecution under Decius, but was later found and beheaded (A.D. 258).



  • DULCISSIMA, (Date Unknown), a virgin-martyr of whom nothing is known beyond her being patron saint of Sutri in present-day Italy.

  • Icon of St. Edith of Wilton

  • EDITH of WILTON, St. Edith of Wilton was the daughter of King St. Edgar the Peaceful (8th July) and St. Wilfrida (13th September). She received monastic tonsure at Wilton at the age of fifteen, and devoted her life to the care of the sick and the poor. Though it was offered many times, she refused the position of abbess. Her repose, foretold by St. Dunstan (19th May), occurred at the early age of twenty-three (A.D. 984) and she was buried at Wilton in the new church of St. Denis. Goscelin of Canterbury wrote that about thirteen years after her repose St. Edith is said to have appeared to several people to enjoin them to exhume her incorrupt relics. This was done, and her relics were found to be incorrupt. Her relics were reinterred, though her thumb was enshrined separately and became an important relic. Goscelin went on to tell how King Canute encountered a terrible storm whilst crossing from England to Denmark; he sought St. Edith’s intercession and the storm calmed. Upon his return to England, King Canute made a pilgrimage to Wilton to give thanks, and commanded that a golden shrine to St. Edith be erected there. Allusions to numerous other, but unspecified, miracles are credited to St. Edith in various hagiographies, and a considerable number of churches throughout England are dedicated to her.

  • TROPARION of ST. EDITH of WILTON — TONE IV
    Thou didst love Christ from thy youth, O blessed one, and ardently
    desiring to labour for Him alone, thou didst struggle in asceticism in
    the royal convent at Wilton. And having acquired humility of soul
    and spiritual stillness, thou didst pass over to the mansions of
    paradise, where thou dost intercede for us O venerable mother Edith.


  • EUGENIA, daughter of Adalbert, Duke of Alsace, and the successor of her aunt, St. Odilia (13th December), as Abbess of Hohenburg (Abbaye de Hohenbourg) on Mont Sainte-Odile in present-day Alsace France. St. Eugenia reposed A.D. 735.
  • LUCY and GEMINIAN, (Late Third Century), these saints have been venerated as martyrs under Diocletian since ancient times. However, all that is known of them is from pious legend. It is highly likely that this St. Lucy is the same as St. Lucy of Syracuse (13th December), and St. Geminian a fictional character.

  • Icon of St. Ludmila of Czechia

  • LUDMILLA, a Bohemian princess and grandmother of St. Wenceslas (28th September), following the untimely repose of her husband, St. Ludmilla led an austere, pious life and continued to be concerned for the Church. However, following the death of her son and successor of her husband, her daughter-in-law, Dragomira, sought to use her influence over the young and inexperienced St. Wenceslas to re-introduce pagan customs back into the country. This, naturally, was met with oposition by St. Ludmilla, and Dragomira eventually sent two assassins to murder her, which they did, whilst St. Ludmilla was at prayer in her home in Techin, A.D. 921. Her relics were intially buried at Techin in the city wall, and numerous healings occurred at her grave, St. Wenceslas, later had her relics translated to church of St George in Prague.
  • ROGELIUS and SERVUS-DEI, St. Rogelius a monk, and St. Servus-Dei, his spiritual child, and possible Cell Attendant, were martyred in Córdoba (A.D. 852) for publicly denouncing Islam (the official charge being blasphemy). They were the first martyrs under the Emir Muhammad I of Córdoba and are counted amongst the forty-eight Christians known as the Martyrs of Cordoba.


  • 29th September:

  • ALARICUS (ADALRICUS, ADALRAI), a son of Duke Burkhard II of Swabia, who was educated at Einsiedeln Abbey in Switzerland. Following the completion of his studies, St. Alaricus received monastic tonsure at Einsiedeln, later living as an anchorite on Ufenau Island in Lake Zurich until his repose A.D. 975.
  • CATHOLDUS, ANNO, and DIETHARDUS, eighth century monks who evangelised the region of Eichstätt in Bavaria.
  • FRATEMUS, seventh Bishop of Auxerre in Burgundy, and believed to have been martyred circa A.D. 450.
  • LIUTWIN, founder of the double monastery of SS. Peter and Mary at Mettlach in Saarland (30 km / 19 mi south of Trier) circa A.D. 690. St. Liutwin served as the 35th Bishop of Trier (circa A.D. 697 – circa A.D. 718). St. Liutwin reposed circa A.D. 722, and was buried at the Abbey of SS. Peter and Mary in Mettlach.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








28 September, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
28th September (NS)15th September (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


15th September:

  • AICHARDUS (AICARD, ACHARD), the son of an officer at the Court of Clotaire II. It was his father wish that St. Aichardus follow him in a career in the military, but St. Aichardus wanted to enter monastic life, and, with the support of his mother, he eventually was tonsured at the Abbey of St. Jouin in at Ansion in Poitou. He went on to serve as Abbot of the Priory of St Benedict at Quinçay near Poitiers, and then succeeding St. Philibert (20th August) as Abbot of Jumièges Abbey. St. Aichardus was known throughout his life as a model of prayer, austerity, and of observance of Religious Rule, he reposed A.D. 687.
  • ALBINUS (AUBIN, ALPIN), The successor of St. Justus (2nd September, and 14th October) as Bishop of Lyons (circa A.D. 380 - circa A.D. 390), though the exact length of his Episcopate is unknown. St. Albinus is credited with having the church of St. Stephen built, and is said to have chosen it for his Cathedral. St. Albinus reposed circa A.D. 390.
  • APRUS (APER, APRE, EPVRE, EVRE), a native of Trier, who began life as a lawyer and acquired great fame on account both of his legal skills as well as his scrupulous integrity. After many years he left the law to become a priest, and circa A.D. 500 chosen to serve as the seventh Bishop of Toul. St. Aprus reposed A.D. 507, following an episcopate during which he was deeply loved by his flock, and was buried in the basilica, which was under construction at the time.
  • EMILAS and JEREMIAH, two young martyrs in Cordoba. St. Emilas, a deacon, and St, Jeremiah, a layman, were imprisoned and then beheaded (A.D. 852) under Abd ar-Rahman II.
  • HERNAN (Sixth Century), a native of Britain, who fled to Brittany during the Anglo-Saxon invasion. There he lived as a hermit at a place which came to be called Locarn, and of which he is also the patron-saint.
  • LEOBINUS (LUBIN), born near Poitiers to a family of peasants, he received monastic tonsure at Ligugé Abbey (Abbaye Saint-Martin de Ligugé) in Vienne, and became an anchorite in early life. St. Leobinus was later ordained to the priesthood, then made Abbot of Brou and finally consecrated Bishop of Chartres (circa A.D. 544). As Bishop St. Leobinus participated in the fifth Council of Orleans (A.D. 549), and the second Council of Paris (A.D. 551). St. Leobinus reposed circa A.D. 557.
  • MAMILLIAN, a Bishop of Palermo in Sicily during the era when the Arian Vandals dominated the island. Exiled by the Arian King Genseric, St. Mamillian reposed circa A.D. 460 in Tuscany, his relics were eventually translated to Palermo.
  • MERINUS (MERRYN, MEADHRAN), as with many of his contemporaries, it is almost impossible to separate fact from fiction in the limited amount of information that remains on the life of St. Merinus. He is commonly believed to have entered Bangor Abbey while still a youth, where he was a disciple of St. Comgall (10th May), serving at one point as Prior. St. Merinus journeyed to Scotland where he founded the monastic community that became Paisley Abbey. Eventually what is now Paisley, Renfrewshire in Scotland, grew up around the Abbey, and St. Merinus is the patron saint of both the town, and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paisley. St. Merinus reposed circa A.D. 620.
  • NICOMEDES, (Date Uncertain), nothing certain is known of St. Nicomedes, the Roman Martyrology and St. Bede the Venerable (25th May) list him on this date, however, the first three manuscripts of the Martyrologium Hieronymianum make no mention of him. It seems safe to say he was an early martyr of the Roman Church. According to most legends St. Nicomedes was a priest, and was martyred at the end of the first century A.D, though there are some recensions which place it during the reign of Emperor Maximianus, at the beginning of the fourth century A.D.
  • PORPHYRIUS, an actor who was performing before the Emperor Julian the Apostate on the Emperor’s birthday in either A.D. 361 or 362. One of the scenes in the play mimicked the sacrament of baptism; St. Porphyrius was immersed, and the baptismal formula recited. However, as St. Porphyrius emerged, he declared himself to be a Christian. Emperor Julian immediately ordered that St. Porphyrius be tortured and then beheaded.
  • RIBERT, a seventh century Abbot of Saint-Valèry-sur-Somme. It is possible St. Ribert was a bishop, and if so it would have been as a regional bishop of Normandy and Picardy.
  • RITBERT, a monk and disciple of St. Ouen (24th August). St. Ritbert also served as Abbot of the monastery in Varennes in Lorraine before reposing circa A.D. 690.
  • VALERIAN, one of the group of fifty Christians, including St. Photinus (2nd June), imprisoned at Lyons by Marcus Aurelius. St. Valerian managed to escape and was able to spend some time evangelising in what is now the Burgundy region of France. Unfortunately, he was captured and put to death near Châlon-sur-Saone circa A.D. 178.


  • 28th September:

  • ANNEMOND (CHAMOND), Archbishop of Lyons, friend of St. Wilfrid (12th October), and godfather of Clotaire III. He was murdered by the tyrant Ebroin in Châlon-sur-Saône A.D. 657.
  • CONWALL (CONVAL), an Irish priest, St. Conwall went to Scotland where he became a disciple of St. Kentigern Mungo (13th January) and worked to spread the Gospel. He reposed circa A.D. 630.
  • EUSTOCHIUM, the third daughter of St. Paula (26th January). She received monastic tonsure from St. Jerome (30th September) in A.D. 382. In A.D. 386, SS. Eustochium and Paula accompanied St. Jerome to Bethlehem where St. Eustochium assisted St. Jerome with his translating of the Bible, he dedicated his commentaries on Isaias and Ezekiel to her. Whilst in Bethlehem St. Jerome founded several monasteries, making St. Paula abbess of them. Following the repose of St. Paula (A.D. 404), St. Eustochium became abbess, serving until her repose A.D. 419.
  • EXUPERIUS (SOUPIRE), fifth Bishop of Toulouse from circa A.D. 400 until his repose sometime after circa A.D. 410 - 412. As bishop St. Exuperius finished construction of the Basilica of St. Saturninus, begun by his predecessor, but he is best remembered for his great austerity and simplicity of life, and selfless charity not just to the people of his diocese, but also to the monks of the Holy Land, Egypt, and Libya. St. Jerome (30th September) praised his virtues, and in appreciation for his gifts, St. Jerome dedicated his Commentary on Zacharias to St. Exuperius.
  • FAUSTUS, born in Brittany circa A.D. 408, St. Faustus received monastic tonsure at Lérins, and later served as Abbot. He was consecrated second Bishop of Riez (in present-day Alpes-de-Haute-Provence) circa A.D. 459. Throughout his life, St. Faustus was a resolute opponent of both Arianism and Pelagianism, and continued the work of St. John Cassian (23rd July) defending orthodox doctrine against heresy. St. Faustus reposed circa A.D. 490.
  • LIOBA, one of the group of nuns from Wimborne Abbey (Dorset), who, at St. Boniface's (5th June) request, left England for Friesland (A.D. 748) to assist him in his Apostolic labours. St. Boniface made her Abbess of the newly founded Abbey at Bischoffsheim. St. Lioba and her nuns played a key role in the conversion of the Germans. She reposed circa A.D. 781, and was buried, like St. Boniface, at Fulda.
  • MACHAN, (Date Unknown), a Scot who trained in Ireland before going to Rome, St. Machan was consecrated bishop, and then returned to his native land. Aside from an entry in the Aberdeen Breviary alluding to his miracles, nothing certain is known of his life.
  • MARTIAL, LAURENCE, and COMPANIONS, (Date Unknown), a group of twenty-two martyrs in the area of northern Africa that corresponds with present-day Algeria.
  • PATERNUS, a second century A.D. Bishop of Auch in present-day southwestern France.
  • PRIVATUS, a Roman who was scourged to death during the persecutions of Alexander Severus, A.D. 223.
  • SILVINUS, a fifth century A.D. Bishop of Brescia in Lombardy. St. Silvinus reposed A.D. 444.
  • SOLOMON (SALONIUS), the first Bishop of Genoa, he reposed circa A.D. 269.
  • STACTEUS, (Date Unknown), a martyr in Rome of whom no further information is extant.
  • TETTA, St. Tetta was an Abbess of Wimborne in Dorset, England, and a friend of St. Boniface (5th June). St. Tetta sent nuns from Wimborne to support St. Boniface in his evangelisation of the Germans. St. Tetta reposed in the second half of the eighth century A.D., and many miracles were attributed to her intercession.


  • Icon of the holy martyr Wenceslaus

  • WENCESLAS (WENCESLAUS, VIACHESLAV), Prince of Bohemia, he was raised as a Christian by his grandmother, the future martyr St. Ludmilla (16th September). He promoted the spread of Christianity throughout Bohemia which was met with great hostility by the native pagans. St. Wenceslas was martyred as a result of a plot fomented by a group of pagan nobles and Boleslaus, his pagan brother and heir to the throne, circa A.D. 935. St. Wenceslas is the patron-saint of Czechia, and is the subject of the popular Carol, Good King Wenceslas, published by John Mason Neale A.D. 1853.
  • WILLIGOD and MARTIN, (Seventh Century), founders of the monastery of Romont, they served as the first and second Abbots respectively.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








27 September, 2016

Byzantine, Texas: 10 super helpful Bible reading tips

Byzantine, Texas: 10 super helpful Bible reading tips: ( Babylon Bee ) - Reading the Bible can be difficult—but with these 10 super helpful tips, you will be on your way to some seriously awesome...

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
27th September (NS)14th September (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


14th September:

  • CÆREALIS and SALLUSTIA, St. Cærealis a soldier, and his wife St. Sallustia, were catechumens of, and baptised by, Pope St. Cornelius (16th September), with whom they were martyred during the persecutions under Decius in A.D. 251.
  • CORMAC, St. Cormac, a King of Munster, was most likely the first Bishop of Cashel in Ireland. Though the reliability of some of the traditions concerning St. Cormac is questionable, he is reputed to have been a great scholar. The authorship of the Sanas Cormaic (Cormac's Glossary), and the now-lost Psalter of Cashel, among other works, have been attributed to him. St. Cormac reposed A.D. 908.
  • CRESCENTIAN, VICTOR, ROSULA, and GENERALIS, said to have been martyred in Carthage along with St. Cyprian (16th September), circa A.D. 258.
  • CRESCENTIUS, according to tradition, St. Crescentius was the eleven-year-old son of St. Euthymius (29th August). It is said that following the martyrdom of his father, St. Crescentius was brought back to Rome where, even under torture, he proclaimed his faith in Christ, and was subsequently beheaded, during the persecutions under Diocletian circa A.D. 300. However, this is all based upon a Life which dates from A.D. 1600, and hence, is of questionable veracity.
  • MATERNUS, the first known Bishop of Cologne. He founded a church at the site upon which Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom) now stands. St. Maternus reposed circa A.D. 325.


  • 27th September:

  • ADHENTUS (ABDERITUS, ADERY), (Second Century), a native of Greece, he served as the second Bishop of Ravenna, succeeding St. Apollinaris (23rd July). St. Adhentus’ relics are enshrined in the Basilica of Sant'Apollinare in Classe near Ravenna.
  • ADOLPHUS and JOHN, two brothers, sons of a Muslim father and a Christian mother. They were martyred after being caught up in the persecutions conducted by Emir Abd ar-Rahman II in Córdoba circa A.D. 850.
  • BARROG (BARRWG, BARNOCH, BARRY), (Seventh Century), St. Barrog was a disciple of St. Cadoc of Wales (24th January), and is the namesake of Barry Island off the coast of Glamorgan, where he lived as an anchorite.
  • CERAUNUS (CERAN), sixth Bishop of Paris who reposed circa A.D. 614, his relics are enshrined in the church of St. Geneviève in Paris.
  • DEODATUS, (Date Unknown), a martyr in Sora in central Italy, whose relics were enshrined in the cathedral there A.D. 1621. No further information on his life is extant.
  • FIDENTIUS and TERENCE, (Date Unknown), martyrs whose relics were discovered in the twelfth century A.D. at Todi in central Italy. There is no further information extant.
  • FLORENTINUS and HILARY, (Date Uncertain), two hermits martyred in France by the Vandal invaders of Gaul. Though there is some debate as to most of the details of their lives, it is agreed they had their tongues were torn out previous to their being beheaded.
  • GAIUS of MILAN, (First Century), very little is known with any certainty about St. Gaius. He is thought to have been a spiritual child of the Apostle Barnabas, and was the third Bishop of Milan. He served that See for twenty-four years, and is believed to have baptised St. Vitalis (28th April) and SS. Gervase and Protase (19th June).
  • HILTRUDE, daughter of a Poitevin nobleman, who lived as a hermit near Liessies Abbey, in present-day Nord-Pas-de-Calais France, under the spiritual direction of her brother, Gunrad, who was Abbot. St. Hiltrude reposed circa A.D. 790.
  • MARCELLUS, a native of either Scotland or Ireland who was a monk at Abbey of Saint Gall (Abtei St. Gallen) in Switzerland. St. Marcellus reposed circa A.D. 869.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








26 September, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
26th September (NS)13th September (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


13th September:

  • AMATUS (AMÉ), a member of the Grenoblois nobility, St. Amatus was, as a child, placed in the Abbey of St. Maurice, Agaunum, present-day Saint-Maurice-en-Valais Switzerland. After completing his education received monastic tonsure at the Abbey, and later lived as a hermit for over thirty years. In A.D. 614 his spiritual father, St. Eustace (29th March), encouraged him to move to Luxeuil Abbey in Burgundy. While at Luxeuil, St. Amatus converted St. Romaricus (8th December), and the two of them went on to found the double-monastery of Remiremont (A.D. 620) with St. Amatus serving as first Abbot. St. Amatus reposed A.D. 630.
  • AMATUS, the particulars concerning this saint have become rather muddled over the ages, hence there is some confusion about his life. The majority opinion seems to be that St. Amatus served as an Abbot of Agaunum, and later as the tenth Bishop of Sion in Valais (Switzerland). St. Amatus reposed A.D. 690.
  • BARSENORIUS, (Seventh Century), a spiritual child of St. Leutfridus of La-Croix (21st June), and an Abbot of La-Croix-Saint-Leuffroi in present-day northern France. The relics of St. Barsenorius are enshrined at Fécamp Abbey in Normandy.
  • COLUMBINUS, the successor of St. Deicola (18th January) as Abbot of Lure, about 100 km (60 miles) east of Dijon, in the Vosges. St. Columbinus reposed circa A.D. 680.
  • HADUWY (HEDWIG), a noblewoman, and granddaughter of St. Ida of Herzfeld (4th September). Following the death of her husband (A.D. 849), St. Haduwy received monastic tonsure, and from A.D. 858 until her repose A.D. 887, served as third Abbess of the Imperial Abbey of Herford (Reichsfrauenstift Herford) in the Duchy of Saxony.
  • MAURILIUS, a native of Milan who studied under SS. Ambrose (7th December) and Martin of Tours (11th November). St. Maurilius accompanied St. Martin when he went to Gaul, and in time was consecrated second Bishop of Angers (circa A.D. 423), reposing circa A.D. 453.
  • NECTARIUS, the seventeenth Bishop of Autun from A.D. 540 until his repose A.D. 549 or 550. He was a friend of St. Germanus of Paris (28th May), whom St. Nectarius appointed to serve as Abbot of the Abbey of St. Symphorian, Autun (Abbaye Saint-Symphorien d'Autun).
  • PHILIP, Prefect of Egypt under Commodus (A.D. 180 - A.D. 192), though he was dismissed from this post when it was learnt he had been baptised. He was then chosen to be Bishop of Alexandria, but the new Prefect sent assassins who mortally wounded St. Philip while he was praying, and he reposed three days later. St. Philip was also the father of St. Eugenia of Rome (24th December), in whose home SS. Protus and Hyacinth (11th September) were employed.
  • VENERIUS, there is no reliable Life of St. Venerius, but the general consensus is that he was an anchorite, and later abbot on the Island of Tino in the Gulf of La Spezia in the northern Ligurian Sea. St. Venerius is believed to have reposed circa A.D. 630, however, there are some scholars who say he flourished in the ninth century A.D.
  • WILFRIDA, St. Wilfrida was the mother of St. Edith of Wilton (16th September), who, after the birth of her daughter, received monastic tonsure from St. Ethelwold of Winchester (1st August) at Wilton Abbey, eventually serving as its Abbess. In time, her daughter joined her at Wilton as a monastic. St. Wilfrida reposed circa A.D. 988.


  • 26th September:

  • AMANTIUS, the patron saint of Città di Castello in Perugia, where he served as a priest. Pope St. Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September) revered his sanctity. St. Amantius reposed circa A.D. 600.
  • COLMAN ELO, St. Colman Elo was born in present-day Co. Tyrone in Ireland. He studied under his maternal uncle, St. Columba (9th June) and went on to found monasteries at Lynally (Lann Elo) in Co. Offaly, Ireland and at Muckmore in Co. Antrim. There he served as founding Abbot-Bishop of Connor. St. Colman was the author of the Airgitir Crábaid (the Alphabet of Devotion), the earliest surviving example of Old Irish prose. He is believed to be the true author of a work ascribed to St. Seachnall or Secundinus (27th November), The Hymn of St. Secundinus in praise of St. Patrick (17th March). St. Colman Elo reposed circa A.D. 610.
  • EUSEBIUS of BOLOGNA, consecrated sixth Bishop of Bologna circa A.D. 370, St. Eusebius was a discerning and erudite Prelate, and a close friend of St. Ambrose of Milan (7th December). He assisted at the Council of Aquileia (A.D. 381) against the Arians. Through a vision, St. Eusebius discovered the hidden relics of SS. Vitalis and Agricola (4th November), and was responsible for having them reverently enshrined. St. Eusebius reposed circa A.D. 400.
  • MEUGANT (MAWGHAN, MORGAN), (Sixth Century), St. Meugant was a disciple of St. Illtyd (6th November) who seems to have lived as a hermit in several places is the west of Britain before settling on the Isle of Bardsey in Wales. There are several churches in Wales and Cornwall dedicated to him, and though no record of his consecration is extant, he has been represented as a bishop with a mitre and crozier.
  • NILUS THE YOUNGER, a monk and fervent advocate for Byzantine monasticism on the Italian peninsula. St. Nilus was well known for his ascetic ways and theological knowledge. He spent some time as a hermit, and at various monasteries, some of which he either founded or helped restore. St. Nilus and some of his monks took refuge at Monte Cassino. However, his crowning achievement was founding the Abbey of Santa Maria di Grottaferrata at a spot just south-east of Rome which was identified to St. Nilus by the Theotokos. Shortly after the building began, St. Nilus reposed (26th December A.D. 1005) at the Sant' Agata monastery in Tusculum.
  • SENATOR, (Date Unknown), a martyr at Albano in present-day Italy.
  • VIGILIUS, a Bishop of Brescia in Lombardy who reposed circa A.D. 506. Nothing further is known of his life.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
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25 September, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
25th September (NS)12th September (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


12th September:

  • AILBE (ALBEUS, AILBHE), (Sixth Century), St. Ailbe is considered to have been the first Bishop of Emly in Ireland and is said to have reposed circa A.D. 527 or 541. Unfortunately, many legends concerning St. Ailbe, all of which are disputed, and some completely unfounded makes it impossible to state with certainty anything further about him.
  • GUY, “the Poor Man of Anderlecht”, St. Guy was the sacristan of Our Lady of Laken. After a business venture he invested in failed, St. Guy went on a pilgrimage, first to Rome, then the Holy Land, that lasted seven years. Shortly after his return to Anderlecht St. Guy collapsed from exhaustion and illness, and reposed shortly thereafter, circa A.D. 1012.
  • SACERDOS, the Archbishop of Lyons from A.D. 544 until his repose A.D. 551. St. Sacerdos was a son of St. Rusticus (25th April), and father of St. Aurelian of Arles (16th June). As Archbishop he presided over the Council of Orléans (A.D. 549), and is remembered as an adviser to King Childebert I.
  • SILVINUS, a Bishop of Verona, he reposed circa A.D. 550, no further information is extant.


  • 25th September:

  • ANACHARIUS (AUNACHARIUS, AUNACHAIRE, AUNAIRE), Born near Orléans, he was educated at the court of King Guntram of Burgundy. St. Anacharius became a disciple of St. Syagrius (27th August), Bishop of Autun; and on the repose of St Ætherius (27th July) St. Anacharius was chosen as his successor and consecrated eighteenth Bishop of Auxerre (A.D. 572). As bishop he restored clerical discipline, supressed popular pagan customs, and convoked the Council of Auxerre (A.D. 578 or 585). St. Anacharius reposed A.D. 604.
  • AURELIA and NEOMISIA, (Date Unknown), believed to have been of Asiatic origin who went on a pilgrimage to Syria, the Holy Land, and Rome. Captured and tortured by Saracens, but were able to escape during a thunderstorm. SS. Aurelia and Neomisia took shelter at Macerata near Anagni, where they reposed.
  • BARR (FINBAR, BARROCUS), (Sixth Century), St. Barr was born in Connaught in Ireland and after completing his studies and receiving monastic tonsure, he is said to have returned to his home where his lived on a small island. He is believed to have founded several small churches in the surrounding area. The culmination of his life’s work was the founding of a monastic school at Lough Eire, which became the foundation of the city of Cork where he served as first Bishop. St. Barr reposed at Cloyne, Co. Cork, after serving as Bishop of Cork for sixteen years, though the exact dates of his life are not known.
  • CAIAN, there is little more to support the existence of St. Caian than the presence of a church dedicated to him at Tregaian in Anglesey dating from the fourteenth century. The name Tregaian is Welsh for “Caian’s settlement”. We are unsure as to the time St. Caian might have lived as some sources place him in the sixth century, whilst others, which are the most credible, claim St. Caian lived in the fifth century, and was either a son or grandson of the great Welsh king St. Brychan of Brycheiniog (6th April).
  • CEOLFRID (GEOFFREY), a native of Northumbria, St. Ceolfrid received monastic tonsure at Gilling in Yorkshire, England. He spent some time at Ripon before settling at Wearmouth-Jarrow where he succeeded St. Benedict Biscop (12th January) as Abbot of that great monastic centre. St. Ceolfrid is remembered as the teacher of St. Bede the Venerable (25th May), and for producing the Codex Amiatinus, the oldest surviving one-volume copy of St. Jerome’s (30th September) Vulgate. St. Ceolfrid reposed at Langres in France (A.D. 716) whilst on a pilgrimage to Rome. His relics were later translated to Wearmouth-Jarrow where they were enshrined.
  • EGELRED, St. Egelred was a monk at Crowland Abbey in Lincolnshire, England, and is numbered amongst the countless brethren martyred during the sack of the Abbey by the heathen Danes in A.D. 870.
  • ERMENFROY (ERMENFRIDUS), a disciple of St. Waldebert (2nd May) at Luxeuil Abbey and later Founder-Abbot of the Priory of Cusance. St. Ermenfroy reposed circa A.D. 670.
  • FIRMINUS (FERMIN) of AMIENS, a native of Pamplona in Navarre who was converted by St. Saturninus (29th November), Bishop of Toulouse, and later served as the first Bishop of Amiens. According to tradition St. Ferminus was martyred in A.D. 257, by being tied to a bull, and dragged to death. He is also the co-patron saint of Navarre in Spain, where is feast in the capital Pamplona is associated with the Running of the Bulls.
  • FYMBERT, (Seventh Century), a bishop in the west of Scotland, St. Fymbert is said to have been consecrated by Pope St. Gregory the Dialogist (3rd September). There is no further information on his life extant.
  • HERCULANUS, (Second Century), a Roman soldier who is said to have become a Christian at the martyrdom of Pope St. Alexander I (3rd May), and soon after martyred himself.
  • LUPUS of LYONS, Archbishop of Lyons from A.D. 535 until his repose A.D. 542. St. Lupus is in all likelihood the first prelate of Lyons to use the title of Metropolitan. During the political upheaval following the martyrdom of King St. Sigismund (1st May), St. Lupus is said to have suffered greatly.
  • MEWROG, (Date Unknown), St. Mewrog was a Welsh saint, the details of whose life have not survived.
  • PRINCIPIUS (PRINCE, PRINCIPE), the twelfth Bishop of Soissons (circa A.D. 474 until his repose A.D. 505. He assisted his brother St. Remigius of Rheims (1st October) at the baptism of Clovis I.
  • SOLEMNIS (SOLEINE),the fourteenth Bishop of Chartres from circa A.D. 490 until his repose circa A.D. 511. His brother, St. Aventinus (4th February), succeeded him as Bishop of Chartres.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?








24 September, 2016

Orthodox Western Saints for Today


Pre-Schism Western Saints Commemorated on
24th September (NS)11th September (OS):



Icon of Orthodox Saints of the British Isles


11th September:

  • ADELPHUS, a grandson of St. Romaricus (8th December), whom he succeeded as Abbot of Remiremont in eastern Gaul. St. Adelphus reposed circa A.D. 670.
  • ÆMILIAN (EMILIAN), according to the oldest of records of the Church of Vercelli in Piedmont, St. Æmilian was consecrated Bishop of Vercelli after living as a hermit for forty years. He reposed, a centenarian, in A.D. 520. No further information seems to be extant.
  • ALMIRUS (ALMER, ALMIRE), a hermit at Gréez-sur-Roc in present-day north-western France. St. Almirus reposed circa A.D. 560.
  • BODO, a member of Austrasian nobility and brother of St. Salaberga (22nd September). St. Bodo married, though he and his wife jointly decided to enter monastic life, with St. Bodo receiving tonsure at the Abbey of Saint-Vincent de Laon. St. Bodo rather reluctantly accepted his selection to be the sixteenth Bishop of Toul, and as bishop founded Bon-Moutier Monastery, the Abbey of Étival, and the Abbey of Othonville. St. Bodo reposed circa A.D. 678.
  • DEINIOL (DANIEL), very little is known of St. Deiniol’s life. He is considered the founding Abbot of Bangor, and thought to have been consecrated Bishop of Bangor by St. Dubricius (14th November). St. Deiniol reposed circa A.D. 584 and was buried on the Isle of Bardsey off the Llyn Peninsula in Gwynedd, Wales. Following his repose, the cathedral at Bangor and several other churches in Wales were dedicated to his honour.
  • FELIX and REGULA, a brother and sister who, at the time of the martyrdom of St. Maurice and the Theban Legion (22nd September) under Maximian Herculeus (circa A.D. 287), took refuge in Switzerland. Unfortunately, they were found and martyred near Zürich, circa A.D. 287.
  • PATIENS, Archbishop of Lyons from circa A.D. 456 until his repose circa A.D. 491, who according to his contemporary St. Sidonius Apollinaris (21st August), despite the austerity of his life, he made himself “all things to all men”. St. Patiens played an active role in fighting the heresies of his day, but is chiefly remembered for devoting all of his income to the poor. St. Patiens reposed circa A.D. 491.
  • PROTUS and HYACINTH, according to tradition SS. Protus and Hyacinth were brothers who served in the household of St. Eugenia (24th December), and had been baptized along with her. SS. Protus and Hyacinth were martyred in Rome during the persecution under Emperor Valerian (A.D. 257-259).
  • VINCENT of LEÓN, an Abbot of St. Claudius in León Spain who was martyred by the Arian Visigoths. There is some disagreement about the date of his martyrdom, with some sources giving circa A.D. 554, and others circa A.D. 630 as the date.


  • 24th September:

  • ANATHALON, according to Milanese tradition the first Bishop of Milan was the Apostle Barnabas, however, this tradition is of somewhat questionable veracity. There seems to be no historical doubt that St. Anathalon, a disciple of the Apostle Barnabas, did serve as the first Bishop of Milan, and exercised the functions of a bishop at Brescia and other parts of Lombardy. St. Anathalon is said to have reposed at Brescia whilst on an episcopal visitation A.D. 61.
  • ANDOCHIUS, THYRSUS and FELIX, St. Polycarp (23rd February) sent St. Andochius, a priest; and St. Thyrsus, a deacon; from Smyrna to Gaul. Landing at Marseilles, they travelled to Lyons, and settled at Autun. There they were given lodging and assistance in their endeavours by St. Felix, a wealthy merchant from the East. All three were martyred (A.D. 179), and their relics were venerated throughout Gaul.
  • CHUNIALD and GISLAR, (Seventh Century), natives of Ireland who are said to have assisted St. Rupert of Salzburg (27th March) in his work to enlighten the south of Germany and Austria.
  • GERARD SAGREDO (GERARDO SAGREDO, SAGREDO GELLÉRT), an Italian monk from Venice who had a principal role in the conversion of Hungary where he served as the first Bishop of Csanád. When he first arrived in Hungary, St. Gerard served as tutor to St. Emeric (4th November) the son of St. Stephen (16th August). Soon St. Gerard went to live as a hermit at Bakonybél Abbey in present-day north-western Hungary. He was elevated to the See of Csanád circa A.D. 1030 and served as its Bishop until his martyrdom in A.D. 1046.
  • GEREMARUS (GERMER), a native of Beauvais in the north of modern-day France, who, with the consent of his wife, received monastic tonsure at the Abbey of Pental in present-day Saint-Samson-de-la-Roque in Normandy, eventually serving as its Abbot. St. Geremarus resigned the abbacy following a revolt by his monks and went to live as a hermit in a nearby cave. In A.D. 655 St. Geremarus founded, and served as first Abbot of, the Abbey of Flay, in Picardy, which became known as Saint-Germer-de-Fly Abbey. St. Geremarus reposed circa A.D. 658, his relics were initially enshrined at Beauvais Cathedral, but were translated to Saint-Germer-de-Fly Abbey in A.D. 1132.
  • RUSTICUS, eighth Bishop of Clermont in Auvergne from A.D. 426 until his repose A.D. 446. Nothing further is known of his life.
  • YSARN (ISARNUS of TOULOUSE), a native of Toulouse who served as an Abbot of the Abbey of Saint Victor in Marseilles, which flourished under his leadership. St. Ysarn was renowned for his care of criminals. He reposed A.D. 1048.


* - Prior to the Schism the Patriarchate of Rome was Orthodox and fully in communion with the Orthodox Church. As Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco +1966 said "The West was Orthodox for a thousand years, and her venerable Liturgy is far older than any of her heresies."

© 2012-2016  Dr. John (Ellsworth) Hutchison-Hall + All Rights Reserved.

Details of British Saints excerpted from Orthodox Saints of the British Isles Volume III. Details of Continental Saints from these sources.



All books by Dr. Hutchison-Hall are available on
Amazon, Google Play, at the iBookstore, and for Nook as well!




Orthodox Western Saints Database
Search by Name or Date








Looking for Orthodox Books, CDs, or DVDs?